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In Spanish, faun is fauno. Why did the English version insist on making the faun into Pan himself? Who was Pan? Why include the god of forests and nature?

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This sounds like it's at least two different questions: one about Pan and one about the other gods. You may want to break it up into multiple posts to get better answers. – KutuluMike Jan 31 at 12:31
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According to Guillermo del Toro, the use of the word Pan in the non-Spanish versions was just a translation issue. It's not just the English version that has this mistake; the French and German translations also make it. Since he wrote his own subtitles, it was del Toro himself that chose to use the word Pan, but he's has admitted that the name is not accurate.

He likely chose Pan because he is the most well-known faun-like creature in classical mythology (even though it's the wrong mythology), so a name that viewers would identify with. But, The Faun is not Pan:

And the character of the faun is essentially the trickster. He is a character that is neither good nor bad. He's a character ... that's why I chose a faun. Not "Pan." Pan is just the translation, which is not accurate. It's a faun, because the faun in classical mythology was at the same time a creature of destruction, and a creature of nurturing and life. src

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So basically its like typo and it must be like "Faun`s labyrinth" – Usman Kurd Jan 31 at 12:56
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I think typo is too trivial. del Toro apparently picked Pan on purpose, knowing that it was inaccurate. He's never explained why he did it, so we can only speculate. (I wouldn't be surprised if he got some "feedback" from the movie studios that would be distributing his film.) – KutuluMike Jan 31 at 13:00
    
thanks for explanation pal – Usman Kurd Jan 31 at 13:08
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At least it didn't make its way back into the Spanish. El Laberinto de Pan would have been quite a different movie… – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 31 at 13:45
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Seems like Italy got the title right, as the movie was named "Il labirinto del fauno" (= the faun's labyrinth). Which is quite funny, as Italy has quite a tradition of mistranslated movie titles ... – lfurini Jan 31 at 13:47

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