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I was reading an article on arstechnica here and I remembered that in Star Trek, Klingons are shown eating a lot of long looking worms.

Anyone know what they are? Has anyone tried them? Or they just acting, and the people are not actually eating the worms?

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I think it safe to assume that, out-of-universe, the actors were not actually eating live worms. (Which is not to say that people have not been known to eat worms on occasion. But if that's what you're after, Reality TV is probably a better bet than Star Trek.) – Harry Johnston Mar 8 at 10:46
    
@HarryJohnston : Not looking forward to eating them...Just curious...Because it looked quite original when the actors ate. – We are Borg Mar 8 at 12:00
    
Here is the episode / scene we are first introduced to gag'h: (TNGS2E8: A Matter of Honor) - youtube.com/watch?v=HoOfjGqo5EY – NKCampbell Mar 8 at 15:41
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Others have already answered the question, but I'll offer a small linguistic note: The word ghargh is in The Klingon Dictionary, with the definition "serpent, worm", suggesting that either word might be appropriate translations. It seems the script writers interpreted it as "serpent worm", and pronounced it gahg. In Klingon for the Galactic Traveler, Marc Okrand made this into a new word, qagh, which specifically refers to gharghmey which are served in a particular fashion. – loghaD Mar 11 at 14:38
    
@loghaD : That's some intricate knowledge of Klingons you got, which planet you come from.. :D – We are Borg Mar 11 at 14:49

These are serpent worms, commonly called gagh by the Klingons.

There are different types of gagh, such as one kind that jumps, one that wriggles, and one that has feet.

Klingons usually eat it alive, but it can also be served stewed, or cold.

It's a safe bet that the actors were not eating real worms. If anything, it was probably spaghetti.

From the Star Trek Cookbook:

There was another dish, the famous gagh, that always had to look like living worms, especially when the Klingon warriors scooped them up in their hands. Orriginally the gagh were white, not whole wheat, Oriental udon noodles that I dyed brown with soy sauce. As a base, you can use soy sauce, some sesame salad dressing, the salad dressing you use for Chinese Chicken Salad, or the brown stir-fry sauce that really clings to the noodles and acts like a dye but really isn't.

live gagh

-Live gagh

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6  
"There's nothing worse than half-dead gagh!" – Buzz Mar 8 at 13:09
15  
Served cold? Only if it's a side dish to a main of revenge. – corsiKa Mar 8 at 15:05
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Looks like Udon to me. Confirmed by this book – Paul Mar 8 at 15:55
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This meal would trigger my gagh reflex. – Hannover Fist Mar 8 at 17:53
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Guys... Stop doing silly jokes and gaghs – Gigala Mar 9 at 9:13

To add to the in-universe answers, it seems like the prop gagh is made from Japanese Udon noodles, according to the Star Trek cookbook, page 59:

There was another dish, the famous gagh, that always had to look like living worms, especially when the Klingon warriors scooped them up in their hands. Originally the gagh were white, not whole wheat, Oriental udon noodles that I dyed brown with soy sauce. As a base, you can use soy sauce, some sesame salad dressing, the salad dressing you use for Chinese Chicken Salad, or the brown stir-fry sauce that really clings to the noodles and acts like a dye but really isn't.

Probably pretty tasty, though he later goes on to say that he mainly was going for the look and the taste is secondary. If you're interested, here is an account of someone who made and ate it.

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Any word on what made it move to give it the "still alive" look? – Michael Mar 8 at 19:57
    
@Michael: They used a kinaesthetic agent to give it a little oomph :) – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 at 22:11
    
@Michael I don't actually have the book, I am just going by the linked Google Books preview. He doesn't mention trying to make them move or anything. – Paul Mar 8 at 22:57
    
If it's made from udon noodles, it's pretty much tasty by definition (</unbiased, objective fact>). I wonder why he says “white, not whole wheat, Oriental udon noodles”, though: udon noodles are by definition made from regular wheat flour and are very white. If you make them with whole grain flour, they're not udon noodles. (And for those who didn't know: if you pour clear dashi broth over cooled udon noodles, you get bukkake. So there's that. I'll leave it up to you whether that adds to or detracts from the deliciousness of gagh.) – Janus Bahs Jacquet Mar 9 at 0:07

That would probably be the Klingon delicacy known as Gagh. Looks pretty tasty!

enter image description here

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There is also racht (which nobody else mentioned), which is essentially a larger version of gagh. I'm not sure if any in universe details are given on their relation. The only time I recall it being seen was in DS9's episode Melora, as well as when Jadzia Dax ordered it in DS9's Playing God:

As for gagh, expanding on the other answers here: There are many varieties. I'm not sure if any other types are detailed in universe, but from the DS9 episode Prodigal Daughter which I just coincidentally happened to watch last night, there is at least:

  • Torgud Gagh, these wiggle on the way down, compared to:
  • Filden Gagh, these squirm on the way down, compared to:
  • Meshta Gagh, these jump on the way down
  • Bithool Gagh, these have feet
  • Wistan Gagh, these are packed in targ blood (targs are a commonly referenced animal native to the Klingon home world, conceptually similar to a wild boar).

The dialog in that episode implies that there are at least 51 varieties:

KIRA: How much gagh did she order?
ODO: Fifty one cases.
EZRI: Each containing a different variety.
KIRA: There are varieties of gagh?
EZRI: Oh, yes. I can remember what each one tastes like, and the way they feel when you swallow them. Torgud gagh wiggles. Filden gagh squirms. Meshta gagh jumps.
(Ezri gags.)
BASHIR: Are you all right?
...
EZRI: Bithool gagh has feet. Flush it out the airlock. All of it.
ODO: Environmental regulations.
KIRA: Why don't you just give it to Martok?
EZRI: He'd insist on sharing it with me as a point of honour. Wistan gagh is packed in targ blood. I have to go now. See you later.

I do not claim to know the difference between "squirm" and "wiggle", but those were the words Ezri Dax used to describe them.

I also know that Klingon's prefer lively, squirming gagh and racht - complaints along the lines of "this gagh is barely moving, it's half dead" are often seen. I also recall an episode of TNG -- A Matter of Honor -- where Riker sampled stewed gagh on the Enterprise, only to be surprised by the relative liveliness of fresh gagh later served to him on a Klingon ship:

RIKER: A Klingon delicacy. That's heart of targ -- this is pipius claw. And this is stewed "gagh."
PULASKI: "Gagh"?
RIKER: Serpent worms... would you like to know how they're prepared?

... later, on a Klingon ship ...

RIKER: This is "gagh," isn't it?
KLAG: Very good. You did some research on our nutritional choices.
RIKER: Yes... but this is still moving.
KLAG: "Gagh" is always best when served live. (covering smile) Would you like something "easier"?
RIKER: Easier?
KLAG: If Klingon food is too strong for you, perhaps I could get one of the females to breast feed you.

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Why do I feel like Riker would have preferred that meal? – FuzzyBoots Mar 8 at 19:54
    
@FuzzyBoots It was a classic moment (and hilariously awkward). I think he made up for it when he took command of the ship! – Jason C Mar 8 at 20:00
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"One... or both?" – HireThisMarine Mar 8 at 20:55
    
I think "live" means it's taken on in the classic manner ans stored live until used. That's much harder than just getting it from the replicator. And that might be the point. – JDługosz Mar 9 at 12:21

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