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I was wondering if anything such as a Poké Ball can exist. They are said to transform the physical creatures into energy. Could something like this ever be possible?

I was also wondering if matter can be shrunk or unshrunk. I understand that this has been the subject of many science fiction plot lines, such as Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, but is this plausible? Perhaps when the creatures are turned into energy, they are just shrinking to be small enough to fit inside a baseball / golf ball sized object.

If not, could such a device store information about a creature? If that is the case, would these creatures have memories, or would they have to be created on the fly? I assume if data can be collected properly we can form physical objects as long as we have enough detail. I imagine this working like a cellular 3D printer, where each cell can be constructed, though it may need to have even more detail, like a molecular 3D printer.

Are memories able to be mapped as information? How are they stored in the brains of animals? Do the Pokémon have memories?

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closed as not constructive by Sachin Shekhar, phantom42, Micah, John O, Kyle Jones Nov 26 '12 at 19:38

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No, period..... –  DavRob60 Nov 26 '12 at 18:07
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These sound like physics and biology questions, not sci-fi. –  Don Simon Nov 26 '12 at 18:09
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@DavRob60'smustache I find it hard to believe that you answered the question about the color of smurf blood with such vigor, yet you can't even give a thoughtful answer to a serious question. –  LickitungAmongUs Nov 26 '12 at 18:17
    
@LickitungAmongUs My childhood of reading Belgian comics book provide me an expertise on the smurf. I'm a bit too old for Pokémon. –  DavRob60 Nov 26 '12 at 18:24
    
We had a discussion in meta about real world speculation questions. The discussion is still inconclusive, as far as I know. –  DavRob60 Nov 26 '12 at 18:25

1 Answer 1

The only way I can think of in which this would be even remotely plausible is with some sort of portable delayed teleportation device. I say teleportation because the technology would be similar to how a teleporter would work.

The device would, upon contact with the pokemon, acquire the current state the pokemon is in, including the current electrical pathways of the pokemon's mind. Then, the device would disintegrate the pokemon. The pokeball would now have the pokemon's complete biological data (like a flash drive), with no live pokemon actually existing anymore. Then, when the trainer wants the pokemon back, the pokeball could reconstruct the pokemon wherever the pokeball is thrown. The pokemon would be in the exact same state it was right before it was disintegrated, unless the pokeball somehow modified the data of the pokemon (to get rid of injuries or something).

Not really plausible with any sort of current technology, but hey, who knows what's gonna go down in the next couple of thousand years.

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I think you may be onto something. In many of the descriptions of the Pokéball, it says that the inside of the ball is Pokémon friendly. Perhaps they are not being shrunk at all, and are being teleported into an alternate dimension, which only exists for that specific Pokémon. This might even be as you are saying, where their biological data is saved to a flash drive which is inserted to the Pokémon's matrix-like prison. In some of the Pokémon media, we can see inside of the balls, and that can probably be explained like a computer monitor showing the state of the matrix. –  LickitungAmongUs Nov 26 '12 at 18:45

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