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They don't always wear a hat, but when they do, it's pointy.

Why do fantasy writers depict pointy hats as the headgear of choice for Witches and Wizards?

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Because they're unimaginative... –  Izkata Aug 10 '13 at 18:04
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Oh no, it's just that they're terribly comfortable. I think everyone will be wearing them in the future. –  Xantec Aug 10 '13 at 19:21
    
In some books however, wizards have pointy shoes. –  Mr Lister Aug 11 '13 at 8:55
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2 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

The primary reason writers still use the witch's hat in their literature is because the pointy hat is a form of writer's shorthand, a means to indicate to the reader we are seeing a witch, a being of power, of dark pacts, potentially dangerous, to be respected and feared. Yes, it is the very definition of stereotyping, but it works.

This image of the witch is personified for most modern people by the portrayal of the Wicked Witch of the West. (see below)

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History of the Witches Hat

The stereotypical images of a witch is that of an ugly, old hag wearing a tall, black, pointed hat with a broad rim. There are different theories as to the origin of this stereotype, none of them certain.

  • Most likely, the hat is a fairly modern artist’s creation. In medieval woodcuts, witches are shown wearing various costumes of the times, including headscarves and hats of different fashions. Many are shown bareheaded, with locks flying in the wind.

Witch Woodcuts

  • It is possible that the witch’s hat is an exaggeration of the tall, conical “dunce’s hat” that was popular in the royal courts of the 15th century or the tall but blunt-topped hats worn by Puritans and the Welsh. No matter what the fashion, pointed hats were frowned upon by the Church, which associated points with the horns of the devil.

  • Brimless, conical hats have long been associated with male wizards and magicians. Goya painted witches with such hats. It is possible that an artist, somewhere along the way, added a brim to make the hats more appropriate for women.

  • One theory holds that the stereotypical witch’s hat came into being in Victorian times or around the turn of the century, in illustrations of children’s fairy tales. The tall, black, conical hat and the ugly crone became readily identifiable symbols of wickedness, to be feared by children.

Witches in the Air, Goya, 1798

Witches in the Air, Goya, 1798

  • Witches in the Air is eerie. These witches wear pointed hats but are unusual in most other ways. They fly but need no broomsticks, they are young and, most importantly, they are male. I don’t know where the idea of witching being a purely female pursuit came from, it is by now the common idea, but it was not accepted in Goya’s time that only girls could grow to be witches.

  • In the painting a few witches have flown down and have scooped a man away from his friends. One survivor is making a run for it with a sheet over his head. He has his thumbs stuck out between the index and second fingers of each hand. This gesture is called the figa and it is to ward away evil.

  • This painting is not only scary because it features different kinds of witches from those we are used to. It seems the victim has been picked-on at random. The picture feels like a snapshot of a crime-in-progress. The witnesses and the inclusion of a commonplace donkey make it seem like a rural scene that has gone suddenly wrong. The witches are not frail wispy things cackling in the shadows. They are painted brightly. They are healthy and in great shape. The have lifted their victim into the air, as he kicks and screams. The witches are leaning in and appear to be eating him.

It is images like this one which help to cement the pointed hat as a harbinger of magic, of potential evil, of forces dark and beyond the ken of mortal men. The history of wizards hats didn't hurt their reputations either.

Doing my own research, I noticed there were many images that included a buckle, much like a Quaker's hat, which has the same appearance except with a round dome. Among the Quakers, their hat was a symbol of social power and allegiance to their religion and each other.

  • The culture of witches (as interpreted by religious people) may have included the idea of an allegiance to Satan, a collection of witches, and their pointy hat was a symbol (a pointed horn showing an allegiance to Satan). It was this kind of project which added to the mystique (such as it was) of witches.

  • Manuals for fighting witches also included lifestyles, clothing, demonic marks used to recognize them. Such manuals were revised over the centuries and may have also led to the recognition of the pointed hat as a potential marker.

  • The Malleus Maleficarum, (Latin for "Hammer of The Witches) was an infamous witch-hunting manual written in 1486 by two German monks, Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger. It was used by both Catholics and Protestants for several hundred years, outlining how to identify a witch, what makes a woman more likely than a man to be a witch, how to put a witch on trial, and how to punish a witch. The book defines a witch as evil and typically female. This book was not given the official Imprimatur of the Catholic Church, which would have made it approved by church authorities, but was used by the Inquisition nevertheless.

References:

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"but was used by the Inquisition nevertheless." - while inquisition was probably not the best chapter of the Catholic Church history it was usually not directly involved in witch burning. "Most inquisitors simply disbelieved in witchcraft and sorcery as superstitious folly.", "The book [Malleus Maleficarum] was soon banned by the Church in 1490, (...) and became unduly influential in the secular courts." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch-hunt –  Maciej Piechotka Aug 11 '13 at 8:00
    
I am not sure what your point was, Maciej Piechotka. I am not defending or promoting witch-hunting, nor am I denigrating the Church or its workers...so there is no need to add this particular addenda...unless I am missing something, in which case please elaborate so I can understand what your message is. –  Thaddeus Aug 11 '13 at 8:22
    
Just a comment to part of sentence that it was used by inquisition which is not fully accurate. Possibly it is just nitpicking. –  Maciej Piechotka Aug 11 '13 at 18:21
    
The Inqusition was not involved in most of the executions publicly blamed, and did not make extensive use of Melleus Maleficarum... Pretty much only the protestants did. The Inquisition had its own methods; said methods were part of the inspiration for MM, but not the same as. –  aramis Aug 12 '13 at 23:16
    
Goya's witches' hats are split laterally at the top, making them look (to me) very much like bishops' mitres. –  Beta Mar 19 at 19:50
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A witch is a healer, plain and simple, and they've been persecuted throughout the centuries for the same reasons any other non-mainstream groups have been: fear of the unknown, and ignorance.

Witches are not creatures of evil, and they've never swooped down from the sky to harass people or eat small children. A witch is a protector, not a destroyer, and each witch has a unique personality, just like any other human being.

As for the hat... the cone-shaped hat traditionally worn by witches is symbolic of wisdom and intelligence, not being a dunce (good hell, the person who thought that one up needs a swift kick in the ankle). Its pointed shape represents the cone of power, which is associated with the circle, the symbol of the sun, unity, eternity, rebirth, and the triangle.

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The first part of this doesn't really answer the question, and the second part needs citations to back up your info. –  Monty129 Mar 19 at 16:12
    
The first part of my answer addresses the misinformation posted. As for the second part, I'm a life-long witch, a member of several organizations centered around the practice of witchcraft and educating those new to the Craft, and I'm a respected teacher and leader in my community. If you want citations, feel free to search the internet for them, because nothing I've said can't easily be found on numerous resource sites for the witch community. –  user24045 Mar 19 at 16:47
    
If there is misinformation, it should be addressed in a comment. –  SSumner Mar 19 at 16:49
    
That was actually what I'd tried to do. ;-) –  user24045 Mar 19 at 16:50
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A good answer should not require a user to go look up more information. Cite the necessary information to back up your point, providing links for additional information if necessary. If it can easily be found, this should be no problem for you to do. –  phantom42 Mar 20 at 12:42
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