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I thought it was from TNG, but it might be something else.

The crew somehow get trapped in some kind of altered time state (either time slows down or they get put in another dimension) The only way to fix it is to wait until a future point in time. So they end up living most of their lives into old age on the ship. Several characters get married and develop close relationships. Finally the one character who ages the least (I think Worf, but it may have been a Klingon like character) has to warn the crew from the different dimension not to do something that will cause the time-disturbance.

I know its a fuzzy description, but I remember it being a good episode

does this sound familiar to anyone?

Thanks

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OT: this very same concept is present in a famous Dr. Who episode. –  Lohoris Feb 2 at 17:55
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Oh my. People who complained about too much time travel on ST apparently have a reason. –  DVK Feb 2 at 18:24
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@DVK - Remind me to go back in time and warn Roddenberry not to use time travel as a plot so often. Unless my time travel is what convinces him to use it in the first place - tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TimeTravelTenseTrouble –  Richard Feb 2 at 19:20
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@Richard I would upvote your comment, but your link to TVtropes will surely ruin somebody's day/life. You monster. –  evilsoup Feb 2 at 19:49
    
@evilsoup - youtube.com/watch?v=5yXDpXJbLbM –  Richard Feb 2 at 21:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

I think you're actually remembering the very last Stargate SG-1 episode, Unending, which had exactly this plot. The role you remember as Worf was actually Teal'c.

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Thats it! Thank you –  CRC9 Feb 2 at 19:03
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Interesting, it matches an ST:Ent episode perfectly too, with T'pol instead of Worf. –  Kevin Feb 2 at 19:05
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Worf and Teal'c are hilariously interchangeable, they're both brooding warrior aliens/fish out-of-water character types. –  Mark Rogers Feb 2 at 22:32
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@MarkRogers Except Teal'c manages to win his fights. –  fredsbend Feb 3 at 5:50
    
Doesn't really line up with the question; IIRC (a) they didn't actually have to wait, first Carter wanted to up the shields, then phase the ship, then finally she came up with a solution (b) that reversed time, but not really in a different dimension (maybe he mixed it up with the SGA finale which had a touch of that). –  Nick T Feb 4 at 1:13

I believe you are thinking of the Enterprise episode E2.

Wikipedia's description

The starship Enterprise encounters a future version of itself that, due to a temporal phenomenon, had been sent back 117 years into the past. This Enterprise was originally identical to the "real" Enterprise, with the same crew, but had been sent back in time after entering an unstable subspace corridor. For decades it existed in the Expanse, never contacting Starfleet,1 waiting to catch up with the current Enterprise and warn its past self about the wormhole. The only crewmember to survive through the decades was Sub-commander T'Pol, who finds she has the privilege of meeting a less aged version of herself. All of the other inhabitants of the ship are descendants of the original crew (some of whom have interbred with friendly aliens they encountered along the way). For example, Lorian (David Andrews), the captain, is the son of Commander Tucker and T'Pol. As such the Enterprise has become a generational ship.

Compare to your description:

The crew somehow get trapped in some kind of altered time state (either time slows down or they get put in another dimension)

Sent back in time

The only way to fix it is to wait until a future point in time.

When their future selves get to the same point

So they end up living most of their lives into old age on the ship. Several characters get married and develop close relationships.

Yep, generational ship

Finally the one character who ages the least (I think Worf, but it may have been a Klingon like character)

T'pol, at the ripe old age of 200-something.

has to warn the crew from the different dimension not to do something that will cause the time-disturbance.

(Don't) fly into the nebula

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This is a different episode that I was thinking of, but it sounds just as good -Im going to check it out...Thanks –  CRC9 Feb 2 at 19:08
    
@CRC9 I wouldn't consider it "good", given that the exact same plot has been recycled time and again... –  Lohoris Feb 3 at 8:18

On the face of it, it sounds like you're describing the Episode "Twilight" from the latest series Star Trek : Enterprise.

The effect of a Delphic Expanse anomaly leaves Archer unable to form any new long-term memories. Twelve years later, he wakes up one morning and is stunned to learn the outcome of the Human-Xindi conflict, including the loss of Earth, and the near-annihilation of the Human race.

Archer receives a hero's welcome aboard his old ship. After the first phase of treatment, Phlox and T'Pol examine records of Archer's brain scans from twelve years ago and realize that the parasites they have eliminated in the present have apparently disappeared from the past as well. If Phlox were to successfully complete the treatment and eliminate all the parasites, then it would be as if the parasites had never existed. This would effectively change history, and Archer would never have suffered from memory loss. Perhaps with Archer in command, Enterprise would have stopped the Xindi weapon, Earth would not have been destroyed, and humanity would not have been nearly wiped out.

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Twilight_(episode)

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Isn't your screenshot of old T'Pol from E²? –  Izkata Feb 2 at 21:25
    
The perils of commenting from a mobile phone –  Richard Feb 2 at 21:38

I think the episode you are referring to is the TNG episode "Cause and Effect".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cause_and_Effect_(Star_Trek:_The_Next_Generation)

From the Wikipedia article on the episode:

The Enterprise is severely damaged. The ship explodes, killing the entire crew. Data,Worf and some others then play cards.

The Enterprise-D is shown to be stuck in a time loop, with events culminating in the destruction of the ship as a result of a collision with another Starfleet vessel that emerges from a space-time distortion. As each loop proceeds, the crew members, though unaware they are in the loop, have increasing feelings of déjà vu; Dr. Beverly Crusher begins to hear numerous conversations before going to bed, and during one cycle, manages to record the voices on a tricorder. Analysis reveals that the voices are Enterprise crewmembers during the hours before the destruction of the ship, with Picard yelling "all hands abandon ship !" before the recording stops abruptly. The crew discovers the time loop is caused by dekyon distortions near the space-time anomaly, and program Data to send a short message to his counterpart in the next iteration to take action on. Data sends the signal moments before the ship is destroyed again.

On the next iteration, the crew still experiences déjà vu, but actions performed by Data often reveal the number three, going against their vague memories. They make the same conclusions from the previous iteration, and Data realizes the number three must have some as-yet-unknown significance to break the loop. The Enterprise again arrives at the anomaly, and as the other ship emerges, both Data and Riker suggest alternate plans to avoid being hit. Though Captain Jean-Luc Picard opts for Data's plan, Data realizes that the "three" message was in reference to the number of insignia pips worn by Riker, and initiates Riker's plan instead. The Enterprise is able to avoid being hit and thus, the time loop is broken. The crew discovers they have been stuck in the loop for 17 days, while the ship they narrowly avoided, the USS Bozeman, has been missing for more than 80 years. The Enterprise welcomes the Bozeman to the 24th century at the end of the episode.

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Actually I think this sounds like the DS9 episode "Children of Time"

From Wikipedia:

The starship Defiant is caught in a type of "quantum-bubble" surrounding an inhabited planet. After investigation, it is discovered that the inhabitants are the descendants of the Defiant's crew. Generations of descendants have been living on the planet for many years and their own history began when the Defiant tried to escape from the bubble. Instead of passing through its energy barrier, the ship was thrown back in time two centuries and crashed with no hope of contacting the Federation or repairing the ship. Faced with that reality, the small stranded crew of the Defiant (including Dax, Sisko, O'Brien, etc.) decided to remain and establish a society.

The society presented to the crew of the Defiant includes mostly the descendants of the original inhabitants. The only original "colonists" are Odo, whose Changeling physiology gives him greater longevity than the rest, and the Trill symbiont Dax, in a new host, Yedrin Dax, descendant of Worf and Jadzia Dax.

The crew is forced to choose between repairing the Defiant and escaping the situation (wiping out their descendants and everything they've built), and remaining, allowing the Defiant to crash and letting things evolve as they have been presented to them. After much discussion, they choose the latter. Unbeknownst to them, however, the future Odo, wishing to prevent Kira from dying, changed their flight plan. Instead of flying through the spot in the atmosphere that will cause them to be flung back in time, they escape from the bubble, and wipe out their descendants and the colony they had built.

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It doesn't really match. Also the OP has actually confirmed that you're wrong. –  Richard Feb 2 at 22:09
    
Original question mentioned Star Trek. I still think this is a pretty good match. If OP thinks it's another episode then so be it! –  Frank_Zafka Feb 2 at 22:58
    
I've edited the question a little to make it less trek-centric :-P –  Richard Feb 2 at 23:00

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