Take the 2-minute tour ×
Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for science fiction and fantasy enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the Wizard of Oz (the movie version) the Good Witch of the North, Wicked Witch of the West and Wicked Witch of the East are all mentioned.

Was there ever a Witch of the South?

share|improve this question
2  
Witch "Are you a good witch, or a bad witch?" Dorothy "I prefer not to take sides. " –  Jack B Nimble Oct 7 '11 at 16:52
1  
Paula Deen, of course. –  Chris B. Behrens Mar 16 '13 at 16:02
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

If you are talking about the 1939 film, no Witch of the South is mentioned. I searched the movie script online and no instance of "south" was found. In the film, Glinda is the Good Witch of the North. In the book, Glinda is the Good Witch of the South. In the film, Glinda performs the functions which the book's Good Witch of the North performed.

In the 1939 film version of The Wizard of Oz, Glinda is the Good Witch of the North, not the South as in the book. She is played in the film by Billie Burke. Glinda performs the functions of not only the novel's Good Witch of the North and Good Witch of the South, but also the novel's Queen of Field Mice, by being the one who welcomes Dorothy to Oz, sends her "off to see the Wizard," and orchestrates her rescue from the deadly poppy field in addition to revealing the secret to going back home.

Source: Wikipedia

If you are talking about the books, Glinda is the Good Witch of the South. There is a Good Witch of the North, but she is not very fleshed out.

She appears in Chapter 2. The Council with the Munchkins.

A description of her appearance:

Three were men and one a woman, and all were oddly dressed. They wore round hats that rose to a small point a foot above their heads, with little bells around the brims that tinkled sweetly as they moved. The hats of the men were blue; the little woman's hat was white, and she wore a white gown that hung in pleats from her shoulders. Over it were sprinkled little stars that glistened in the sun like diamonds. ... But the little woman was doubtless much older. Her face was covered with wrinkles, her hair was nearly white, and she walked rather stiffly.

Explaining the existence of the four witches:

"But I thought all witches were wicked," said the girl, who was half frightened at facing a real witch. "Oh, no, that is a great mistake. There were only four witches in all the Land of Oz, and two of them, those who live in the North and the South, are good witches. I know this is true, for I am one of them myself, and cannot be mistaken. Those who dwelt in the East and the West were, indeed, wicked witches; but now that you have killed one of them, there is but one Wicked Witch in all the Land of Oz--the one who lives in the West."

Source

Here is a 1900 illustration of the Witch of the North from the book:

The Witch of the North as illustrated by W. W. Denslow (1900)

Wikipedia has this to say about her:

The Good Witch of the North is a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. She is the elderly and mild-mannered Ruler of the Gillikin Country. Her only significant appearance in Baum's work is in Chapter 2 of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), in which she introduces Dorothy to Oz and sends her to meet the Wizard, after placing a protective kiss on her forehead. She makes a brief cameo appearance at Princess Ozma's birthday party in The Road to Oz (1909), but is otherwise only mentioned elsewhere in the series.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Now, obviously, Galinda is the Good Witch of the North. Elphaba is the Wicked Witch of the West. But, in Oz the Great and Powerful (2013) movie, is is shown that Theodora, sister to Evanora, most likely the Wicked Witch of the East, is at first Good, but her sister, who is evil, makes her eat an apple making her show her wicked side. She is then changed to look like the Witch of the West that we all know and hate. It should be noted that when Theodora is crying, the watery tears burn her cheeks and she pleads with her sister to stop the pain. This is much like the water Dorothy throws onto the Witch of the West, (Theodora but now Elphaba). In the movie, Galinda states that she is the Good Witch of the South, not the North. This is odd, seeing as that the Graveyard she is first seen at and her kingdom is to the north of the Emerald City. There was never a show of who is or will be the good witch of the North. This is assumably Galinda, as in the Wizard of Oz movie, but then who will be the Witch of the South? We may never know. But if director Sam Raimi is continuing the series, we may find out in either of the other movies. My assumption is that the Wizard himself has taken over the south for Galinda, or that the true Witch of the South is actually Dorothy herself. Seeing how she is from the south, Kansas, that may be the reason that she was brought to Oz in the first place.

share|improve this answer
    
A big problem with your answer is that you're mixing versions/universes. The details of the original movie and books do not match the details of the world of Wicked and neither match the details of the world of the Sam Raimi movie. –  phantom42 Mar 16 '13 at 20:23
add comment

I haven't read the original books of Oz. I know there is a good witch of the south in one of the books, from what I read on some blogs. However, when I just view the film, I come to the conclusion that Dorothy is the good witch. She's from the South (Kansas) and she certainly does many good deeds. We do see the the bad witches from East to West. The good which from North and the good witch from the South being Dorothy.

Well that's my take on it.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought Kansas is considered to be in the mid-Western US –  Niall C. Nov 2 '12 at 19:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.