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If Quicksilver runs at speeds faster than the speed of sound then how come the song he's listening to on headphones is playing at a normal rate?

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marked as duplicate by phantom42, Ward, Meat Trademark, Monty129, Richard Aug 13 at 18:08

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If this were about the Flash the answer would be the Speed Force. Specifically, because the music player is on his body the Speed Force would allow it to play at the same rate as Flash's perception. However, I don't think Quicksilver's powers work that way. –  numaroth Aug 13 at 13:46
    
By the way, this question has a good answer here. –  numaroth Aug 13 at 14:00
    
Kenster is correct, in a way. Quicksilver's experience is a few minutes while the others barely notice a split second. I conclude that the music was largely for the benefit of the audience in the theater. If devices on his person are operating at his rate of speed, then he hears the music as one would normally. Otherwise he'd hear nothing and the Walkman would be useless. –  Ihor Sypko Aug 13 at 14:46
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Assumption: He adjusted the gear ratio of the tape player to run at 224½ inches per second (60× standard speed) so he could enjoy it. He apparently also overclocked the CRT and timer on the Pong machine. Not exactly a character who much cares about sharing his toys with others, was he? –  BRPocock Aug 13 at 15:53

1 Answer 1

He can hear because the headphones will be moving at the same speed as him, thus will be projecting sound at a normal rate relative to him. As the headphones could create a sealed container of air between the speaker and his ear, the air inside would be relative motionless to both the source of sound (the speaker) and the recipient (his ear). Consider this article on Felix Baumgartner breaking the sound barrier.

Anybody else would not be able to hear the music, unless they were directly behind his direction of travel. But then the sound would be incredibly distorted due to the Doppler effect.

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To explain how the last paragraph works, I present you the Supersonic Boombox from what-if.xkcd.com/37. Same concept, slightly different execution. –  Nate Kerkhofs Aug 13 at 13:36
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I think this misses the point of the question. In the kitchen room scene, his moment of awesomeness lasted a tiny fraction of a second of real time. How much of the song would his tape player play during that time? –  Kenster Aug 13 at 14:27
    
See my comment above. –  Ihor Sypko Aug 13 at 14:47

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