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Aeron Greyjoy is introduced in ACOK (and is later a POV in AFFC), and is also known as "The Damphair".

What is the correct way to pronounce that name?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's what westeros.org said about it:

Aeron — ['ɛəɹən] air-ən, like Aaron

Damphair grrm & jl ['dæmphɛəɹ] damp-hair rd ['dæmfɛəɹ] dam-fair

Westeros.org said that in the below link GRRM pronounces Dhamphair damp-hair.

Apparently it is said in this video, but I haven't watched it yet.

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2  
+1 for nailing it - 3:52 - 4:10 in the video, GRRM clearly states "damp hair, I suppose I should have put a hyphen in between" –  gowenfawr Aug 18 '14 at 17:41
    
I did not know any of this. Good find! –  Mooz Aug 19 '14 at 2:43
    
@Mooz It was a simple Google search and something I had read before. –  itlookslikeimaqueen Aug 19 '14 at 2:46
    
I always read it "dumb fair" xD –  yondaime008 Jun 5 at 16:56

Unlike Tolkien, George RR Martin doesn't provide elaborate pronunciation guides for his characters' names. So there may not be a fully canonical answer.

That said, "aer" seems to represent a sound similar to the English word "air" -- so Aeron more or less sounds like "Air On".

Damphair is a nickname referring to dousing with water as part of the worship of the Drowned God. So it seems fairly obvious this should be pronounced "Damp hair" (ie. we are saying Aeron's hair is damp). In this case, the "ph" should not be rendered as an "f" sound (Aeron Damfair sounds silly and loses the meaning of wet hair).

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So you're telling me this guy's name is "Air on damp hair"? I guess he would rather have dry hair... –  gla3dr Aug 18 '14 at 18:05

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