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In Marvel Cinematic Universe, military tried to create super soldiers like Hulk, but they failed. So, the program was shut down.

Where did they fail? Didn't Blonsky get Wolverine type super healing capability? Why couldn't it make the military stronger? Other than this, wasn't Abomination a success (despite it wasn't an original work of military)? He was defeated by Hulk, but enemy forces don't have Hulk. When it comes to anger, who cares as long as you are focused on target. Abomination was indeed in full control and he was always after Hulk.

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Abomination was in control? Sure he was focused on his target, but he killed many people in the process –  EricSSH Sep 2 at 17:31
    
Obviously it didn't work because they lacked the Vita-Rays. –  Jeff Sep 2 at 17:32
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@SachinShekhar War zones are rarely so well defined as to be void of all civilians. That is one reason why modern military weaponry is trending towards being as accurate as possible, to reduce the possibility of collateral damage or death. –  Xantec Sep 2 at 17:41
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In the movie universe it took Banner 2 movies to learn how to control the Hulk, and we really didn't see him in control until the Avengers. I don't think there is enough information in the movie universe to answer this question –  EricSSH Sep 2 at 17:48
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@SachinShekhar You also don't want it killing your soldiers in the "war zone" which would almost inevitably happen. –  Meat Trademark Sep 2 at 23:58

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up vote 16 down vote accepted

Failure is a relative term. The Super Soldier program in the Marvel Cinematic Universe did create notable successes including Captain America. He was everything the military wanted in a soldier; Smart, strong, fast, durable, an asset both tactically and strategically. Unfortunately, they were only able to produce one.

  • The military will spend money on projects able to produce results that can be replicated. In the case of Captain America and his shield, both were one time events that either lacked resources (vibranium) or particular genius (Erskine) to produce others.

  • Emil Blonksky's initial transformation appeared successful even though the military used gamma radiation rather than the mysterious Vita Rays used for Captain America. This would later turn the Abomination into a hulking creature unsuitable for most strategic military operations.

  • The Abomination would have been considered successful overall, he could transform at will, he did follow orders (for a time) and did have the power they desired. But he was ultimately uncontrollable. He was a bomb with legs, killing everything where he landed.

  • For the military, a weapon that cannot be pointed and completely controlled is of limited strategic value. Tactically a weapon like the Abomination can be dropped somewhere and left to destroy whatever is there but he lacks subtlety, guile and his great size limits his application.

Every attempt to replicate the Super Soldier Serum after Erskine's death has lead to only qualified successes, never without, in some cases, deleterious side effects. Later attempts to create supersoldiers including the Extremis virus, the Deathlock Program and the Centipede Soldiers.

As of 2013, scientists recreated a very similar version of the serum as one of the components of the Centipede Serum, designed to give a person superhuman abilities. This serum was mixed with the Extremis virus, Gamma Radiation and technology from the Chitauri for injection.

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I don't agree that Captain America is everything the military wants in a soldier; he will disobey direct orders when they contradict his principles (which are, in a sense, something very much like the true principles of The United States of America). In theory the U.S. military wants its soldiers to disobey illegal orders, but in practice no general wants that kind of initiative in a subordinate. –  Beta Sep 3 at 5:14
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@Beta - I'd argue he's what the USA (or "free" nation state n) wants in a soldier. The fact that national ideals and functional military contravene is a problem with the military. –  Fake Name Sep 3 at 7:05

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