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With the latest movie of the Twilight saga I came to the understanding that Vampires can have children. According to this Wikipedia entry it is only possible between a male vampire and a human female.

If it is part of Vampire canon, that is a different question. Surely Stephenie Meyer wasn't the first author to put that in their work, hence my question:

Who was the first author to include the idea that male Vampires can have children?

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Don't know enough to call it an answer.. But the idea is not new; take a look, for example, at the Dhampir (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhampir) -- They show up in Balkan folklore, not to mention Bulgarian and Belarusian legends. – K-H-W Dec 30 '11 at 4:30
    
The link I have in my question is to the same Wikipedia article :) – Darius Dec 30 '11 at 17:04
    
facepalm Yeah, well.. I... umm. was expanding on your question! That's the ticket! yeah, yeah... err... – K-H-W Dec 30 '11 at 17:47
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Going through this list, it seems that the first appearance of a dhampir in a book would be in 1980, in a book called Changeling by Roger Zelazny.

This assumes we're only talking about what could be considered "modern" literature, and not reproductions of Balkan or other legends in book form.

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The Holmes-Dracula File, the second book in Fred Saberhagen's Dracula series was published in 1978 (predates the Zelazny book) and mentions a way a vampire and a normal human can have children.

A woman who becomes pregnant in the normal human way when she is also having an affair with a vampire will sometimes give birth to twins: one baby will be normal, one will be a vampire from birth.

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Dhampir are offspring of one human and one vampire parent, and originate from Balkan folklore.

In an essay entitled "The Vampire" by T. P. Vukanović, contained in the larger work Vampires of the Slavs by Jan L. Perkowski in 1976 and originally in the Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society in 1959. There are a few sections that speak about these children of vampires (see below).

While exact dates aren't given, the author (TPV) discusses the origin of the vampire folklore and gives dates starting in the early 1700s.

Dhampires have long been part of this folklore, but they have largely been shared through oral traditions, rather than by texts.

While other research and evidence on this matter surely exists, this should be sufficient to understand that most cases of vampire offspring in science fiction and fantasy works are derived in some way from these historical beliefs.

Whomever the first author was may be hard to discover, as those oral myths were surely written down long before they were published in a work of fiction. Especially considered that this research paper was published in 1959, predating Changeling by 21 years.

Excerpt from essay
Excerpt from essay

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You didn't specify novels in your question, so I think the Blade film series and TV series, based on the Marvel comics of the 1970s, should count. These comics predate the works mentioned in all three existing answers here, as there is explicit mention of a half-vampire in The Tomb of Dracula #58 published in July 1977:

comic

(big thank you to @DetectiveChimp for finding this image!)

According to Wikipedia:

While all vampires are capable of having offspring both through reproduction and 'turning', the birth-rate between mating vampires is so low that it is practically non-existent (even after many centuries, they may only have one or two children).

And from Wikia:

Pure bloods are very capable of siring offspring through reproduction and through turning, as with non-pure bloods, although the birth-rate between mating purebloods is so low that it's practically non-existent.

See also this answer.

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Please add July 1973 to your answer. It will help people reading answers. That's the publication date of "The Tomb of Dracula" 10. – Detective Chimp Dec 5 '15 at 2:20
    
@DetectiveChimp I added it but haven't checked - I'm trusting you! – Rand al'Thor Dec 5 '15 at 2:31
    
Oh no! Because I'm trusting Wikipedia! en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blade_(comics) – Detective Chimp Dec 5 '15 at 2:34
    
OK. I just read the Tomb of Dracula comics from the 70s with Blade. Thank you Marvel Comics app! While Blade does make his first appearance in #10 (July... Marvel Comic apps says 1972, Wikipedia says 1973. Not sure which is correct.). His half-vampire origin is not mentioned until #58 in July 1977. You still beat all the other answers. I'll screen shot it for you here. twitter.com/detchimp/status/672979855848300544 – Detective Chimp Dec 5 '15 at 3:25
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Interesting--this is also an early case of the "sparkling vampire"! – sumelic Dec 5 '15 at 13:24

I don't know for sure if this is the first, but Laurell K. Hamilton has a male vampire impregnating a female human in The Killing Dance from 1997. The woman mentions that they spent a lot of time in a hot tub (presumably to raise the body temperature of the vampire).

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While this is not an direct proof that vampires can reproduce, Dr Lewis Weyland from "The Unicorn Tapestry" by Suzy McKee Charnas is simply member of completely different specie (feeding on blood and able to live through extremely long time), hence its natural he can reproduce. Although its not clear does it has to be with another vampire or human, he does ask his partner about contraception before they have sex.

This story has been published in 1980 so it would be similar in age to Zelazny's one.

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