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Was Jean Luc Picard's famous "Make it so." phrase introduced by Patrick Stewart or by the series writers? Was use of the phrase inspired by any other fictional character? What I was wondering was, was the phrase taken from the Aubrey/Maturin novels by Patrick O'Brian. One of the lead characters, Capt. Jack Aubrey RN, uses the phrase frequently. The earliest of these novels was first published in the US in 1969. Was Gene Roddenberry possibly a fan?

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@HorusKol But, was it written into the script or ad-libbed by Patrick Stewart? –  Izkata Jan 25 '12 at 12:52
    
So let it be written, so let it be done. I think Picard ripped it off from Yul Brynner. –  Major Stackings Apr 1 at 21:08

4 Answers 4

From http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Jean-Luc_Picard

Make it so.

Catchphrase first used in "Encounter At Farpoint" (28 September 1987) by Gene Roddenberry, and thereafter used in many episodes and films, instructing a crew member to execute an order.

This would indicate that the phrase "Make it so" was scripted by Roddenberry, and was not an ad-lib.

As for inspiration - without the writer specifically answering the question in an interview, it is hard to state categorically if he was inspired from somewhere. However, the phrasing is likely a common term in the military - a subordinate offers a plan of action or advises the commander/captain of readiness to perform an action, and the commander simply needs to respond 'Make it so' or 'Go ahead'. 'Make it so' is particularly imperative, and would fit in with the generally formal nature of miltary command.

Roddenberry had served in the US Army Air Force, and then in the LAPD, so was possibly familiar with the phrasing from there.

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Thanks for the answers so far. What I was wondering was, was the phrase taken from the Aubrey/Maturin novels by Patrick O'Brian. One of the lead characters, Capt. Jack Aubrey RN, uses the phrase frequently. The earliest of these novels was first published in the US in 1969. Was Gene Roddenberry possibly a fan? –  James Ramsay Jan 25 '12 at 13:13
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@JamesRamsay: Please include that to your answer. This comment makes a huge difference making your question a good one, rather than general reference. –  Goran Jovic Jan 25 '12 at 13:43
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Thanks for the suggestion Goran. I've 'made it so'! –  James Ramsay Jan 25 '12 at 14:30
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Or did both Roddenberry and O'Brian get the phrase from the same source, i.e., real life? –  Keith Thompson Jan 25 '12 at 23:49
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@JamesRamsay - Make it so is entirely in place within the formal, clipped language that is used in the military. I can't cite a specific instance of its use, but I wouldn't have been surprised if a superior officer had said it to me when I was in the TA (12 years ago). –  HorusKol Jan 27 '12 at 22:39

"Make it so" was a standard phrase used by British naval officers. It can be seen in context on page 74 of this Google book scan of Frederick Marrayat's 1832 seagoing novel "Newton Forster": http://books.google.com/books?id=6rLTAAAAMAAJ. It would be surprising indeed to find that Patrick O'Brian had invented any stock phrase to put in the mouth of his characters. He was notably meticulous about capturing the real details of British navy life.

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Have just heard Richard Widmark use the phrase "Make it so." in the film 'The Bedford Incident' (1965), so it would seem that it was in use, in the USN at least, prior to the Aubrey/Maturin books. It therefore seems likely that Rodenberry got it from real life. My hypothesis was wrong.

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I heard it in "The Sand Pebbles," a movie released in 1966.

The movie is based on a novel of the same name published in 1962, by Richard McKenna, who spent 22 years in the US Navy, 1931-1953. I haven't read the book, so I don't know if "Make it so" appears in it.

In the movie it was said by the character LIEUTENANT COLLINS, commander of the US gunboat San Pablo in China, played by Richard Crenna. I only heard hiim say it once.

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