4 deleted 2 characters in body
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If *Star Trek**Star Trek episodes and movies are record tapes of future events somehow sent back in time to our era and edited into episode and movie lengths, then the look of everything is 100 percent accurate and the differences between the appearances of the two sets of actors is a real problem to be investigated.

On the other hand, if *Star Trek**Star Trek episodes and movies were produced in the ordinary 20th and 21st century way, but were based on future mission reports sent back in time to the present somehow, only the plot elements dictated by those 23rd century mission reports would be accurate and canonical and the looks of everything, including the appearance of the characters, would be due to 20th century TV and movie production and not canonical data.

If *Star Trek** episodes and movies are record tapes of future events somehow sent back in time to our era and edited into episode and movie lengths, then the look of everything is 100 percent accurate and the differences between the appearances of the two sets of actors is a real problem to be investigated.

On the other hand, if *Star Trek** episodes and movies were produced in the ordinary 20th and 21st century way, but were based on future mission reports sent back in time to the present somehow, only the plot elements dictated by those 23rd century mission reports would be accurate and canonical and the looks of everything, including the appearance of the characters, would be due to 20th century TV and movie production and not canonical data.

If Star Trek episodes and movies are record tapes of future events somehow sent back in time to our era and edited into episode and movie lengths, then the look of everything is 100 percent accurate and the differences between the appearances of the two sets of actors is a real problem to be investigated.

On the other hand, if Star Trek episodes and movies were produced in the ordinary 20th and 21st century way, but were based on future mission reports sent back in time to the present somehow, only the plot elements dictated by those 23rd century mission reports would be accurate and canonical and the looks of everything, including the appearance of the characters, would be due to 20th century TV and movie production and not canonical data.

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The fact that there doesn't seem to be a discussion of the different faces of the characters in the reboot Trek indicates that the faces are supposed to be same and that visual details like the faces of the characters are not canon, and thus that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

The fact that the computer on Old Spock's ship seems to use facial recognition and voice print to accept new Spock, as pointed out by Kevin Laity, indicates that they have identical genes, including the genes that control voice and appearance, and thus their faces are supposed to be same and that visual details like the faces of the characters are not canon, and thus that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

Until and unless an example is found of a comment about different faces in New Trek and Old Trek the default assumption should be that the faces are the same in the story, and that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

The fact that there doesn't seem to be a discussion of the different faces of the characters in the reboot Trek indicates that the faces are supposed to be same and that visual details like the faces of the characters are not canon, and thus that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

The fact that the computer on Old Spock's ship seems to use facial recognition and voice print to accept new Spock, as pointed out by Kevin Laity, indicates that they have identical genes, including the genes that control voice and appearance, and thus their faces are supposed to be same and that visual details like the faces of the characters are not canon, and thus that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

Until and unless an example is found of a comment about different faces in New Trek and Old Trek the default assumption should be that the faces are the same in the story, and that the frame story of Star Trek is that reports were sent into the past, not actual visual record tapes.

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And it is perfectly possible to imagine a frame story for Star Trek in which many Starfleet mission reports and logs have been sent from the future into the present and are used as the scripts for filming episodes and movies based on the future history in those reports. So the Star Trek plots wouldmight be almost 100 percent accurate, just as the plots of most productions of MacBeth are faithful to Shakespeare's play, but the visual details - including the faces of the characters - would be more or less arbitrarily chosen by the 20th and 21st century movie and TV creators and not really part of the canon, any more than the appearances of the actors in a particular production of MacBeth are canonical to Shakespeare's play MacBeth.

And it is perfectly possible to imagine a frame story for Star Trek in which many Starfleet mission reports and logs have been sent from the future into the present and are used as the scripts for filming episodes and movies based on the future history in those reports. So the plots would be almost 100 percent accurate but the visual details - including the faces of the characters - would be more or less arbitrarily chosen by the 20th and 21st century movie and TV creators and not really part of the canon.

And it is perfectly possible to imagine a frame story for Star Trek in which many Starfleet mission reports and logs have been sent from the future into the present and are used as the scripts for filming episodes and movies based on the future history in those reports. So the Star Trek plots might be almost 100 percent accurate, just as the plots of most productions of MacBeth are faithful to Shakespeare's play, but the visual details - including the faces of the characters - would be more or less arbitrarily chosen by the 20th and 21st century movie and TV creators and not really part of the canon, any more than the appearances of the actors in a particular production of MacBeth are canonical to Shakespeare's play MacBeth.

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