9

There are multiple vampire myths (Buffy and Blade to name two) that include the physical attribute of vampires to completely disintegrate upon final death (no remaining dust, residue or particles, including a lack of clothing).
In what work did this attribute of vampires first appear?

  • 5
    There was this little known obscure book saying something to the effect of "ashes to ashes, dust to dust"... – DVK-on-Ahch-To Jan 31 '12 at 18:39
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    Not an answer but: in Buffy specifically, the choice to make vampires dust on death was a practical one: they didn't want to have to explain all the dead vampire corpses lying around Sunnydale. Note that in Whedon's original script (that was butchered into the movie), vampires didn't dust upon death, so that was a change he made for the lore of the show. – KutuluMike Aug 16 '12 at 2:00
16

The answer is in Bram Stoker's Dracula. Dracula turns to ashes in the end of the book. A lot of vampire rules come from Stoker. He did extensive research into the vampire myths and legends before writing his book.

But, on the instant, came the sweep and flash of Jonathan's great knife. I shrieked as I saw it shear through the throat. Whilst at the same moment Mr. Morris's bowie knife plunged into the heart.

It was like a miracle, but before our very eyes, and almost in the drawing of a breath, the whole body crumbled into dust and passed from our sight.

  • You say that Bram Stoker researched various myths, legends and lore to write his book. Does that mean that BS' Dracula the first occurrence of this particular bit of lore, or did it appear even earlier in something he read (or was told)? – Xantec Jan 31 '12 at 20:33
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    A lot of vampire stories were word of mouth stories at the time. They weren't written down. So the research Stoker did was in some cases the first documented example. Especially in the case of a vampire turning to ashes or dust when killed. I'll see if I can find any stories written before his. – Kevin Howell Jan 31 '12 at 22:31

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