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I remember reading Comic World by Diamond Comics (India) in 90s. This was a digest kind of comics featuring stories from lots of different comics (Indian and foreign both).

It contained a Spider-Man comic story. I remember this story because I encountered similar story in Spiderman 2 movie in the next decade (which wasn't surprising because movies are often based on comics). Here's what I remembered from that story:

  • J. Jonah Jameson criticizing Spiderman in newspaper. His outfit was similar to the character in Spiderman movies.

  • Jameson's son was an astronaut and he was returning from space with a capsule (similar to Russian one; not American space shuttle). Jameson tried to replace Spiderman with his son as a hero in newspaper.

  • What happened next was: Parachute of the capsule didn't open. And, Spiderman saved him. It was difficult but he did save the son of a journalist who used to criticize him.

  • But, Jameson continued to criticize Spiderman.

Can you please identify the original comic (probably by Marvel) from which Comic World borrowed it? From the quality of the graphics, it looked much older (60s, 70s) but it can't be newer than 90s.

  • spider-man featuring in diamond comics?? how did I miss that as a kid :) – HBhatia Nov 25 '15 at 11:08
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Amazing Spider-Man Volume 1 #1 published in March of 1963

I can't think of any better explanation than that of the Marvel wikia:

With the Parker household desperate for money following the death of Ben Parker, Peter Parker decides to continue in show business as Spider-Man. However, not only does he find it impossible to cash his paycheck (made out to Spider-Man), but the irrational editorials by J. Jonah Jameson in the Daily Bugle effectively quelch his career. Besides denouncing Spider-Man as a publicity-seeking phony, J. Jonah Jameson also publishes articles lauding his son, John Jameson, a courageous astronaut about to be launched into orbit in a space capsule. J. Jonah Jameson calls his son a "real hero."

The day of the launch finds Peter Parker at the launch site as an observer. The rocket takes off successfully, but a guidance system error causes it to go wildly off course and re-enter the atmosphere. Spider-Man appears at the launch site and offers to replace the defective 24-3B guidance unit in the plunging capsule with a spare. Because there is no way for the military to get to the capsule in time, they allow Spider-Man to try.

Spider-Man commandeers an aircraft and pilot, and together they fly toward the space capsule's re-entry point. Although the capsule is falling fast, Spider-Man manages to get hold of it with his webbing and climbs aboard. He quickly replaces the faulty guidance unit. As a result, John Jameson regains control of the capsule, gets it properly oriented, and opens its parachute. To the joy of all concerned, the astronaut is saved.

Thinking that Spider-Man has at last proved himself, Peter Parker is shocked when he reads J. Jonah Jameson's editorial in the next edition of the Daily Bugle. Spider-Man is accused of deliberately sabotaging the space capsule and staging the rescue as a publicity stunt. With public opinion turning against Spider-Man with each new editorial in the Daily Bugle, Peter Parker's position is as hopeless as ever.

Comic cover

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quoting the Wiki to John Jameson:

John Jonah Jameson III was born in New York City. He is the son of J. Jonah Jameson, the irascible, gruff publisher of the Daily Bugle. Jonah is immensely proud of his son, whom he sees as a true hero. Initially an astronaut, he was first seen being saved by Spider-Man when his craft malfunctioned on re-entry,

which in turn points to

Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 18. ISBN 978-0756692360. "[The Amazing Spider-Man #1] introduced readers to The Daily Bugle publisher and anti-Spider-Man activist J. Jonah Jameson, as Spidey saved his astronaut son, John, from a space mission gone awry."

so its from The Amazing Spider-Man #1

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