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From what I understand the force allows you to predict the future to some extent.

So for example in lightsaber duels or blocking bullets he can predict where it will be.

Now if 2 people are fighting each other how does the force work?

If both predict the other persons move don't you reach an infinite recursion problem or essentially a stale mate where no matter where anybody moves the other will be there to block.

Conclusively wouldn't 2 equal jedis be in essentially a head lock stale mate forever?

EDIT:
I'll illustrate with a simple example. Let's assume there are four places to move a lightsaber A,B,C & D. Now let say the 1st person plans to move to A. Now 2nd player using the force also moves to A at the same time. Now would the 1st player using the force be aware of this and move his lightsaber somewhere else like B? Now a lightsaber doesn't have a concept of each player taking a turn(like chess), but I guess you could say that typically one opponent reacts 1st effectively making him the attacker and the other on defense but to me the issue would still occur. On the other hand you might argue that this infinite recussion problem wouldn't occur because one is on offense and the other on defense and then it switches. I believe this is similar to the shared memory issue in Computer Science but I'm not sure. This issue would get even more complex with multiple Jedis fighting.

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    If your conclusion is correct, every single star wars movie just got a lot less interesting. – user867 Dec 17 '15 at 5:27
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Like anything else in martial combat, it is rare that there are two exactly equal opponents in every way, will ever meet in a duel, with conditions being so perfect they would always be able to use their Force-enhanced awareness to predict the movements of their other opponent perfectly every time.

While each Jedi/Sith may have some degree of precognitive ability, not all use it while fighting other Force-users. Dependence on an ability when you aren't sure how strongly another Force-user is foolish and can lead to over-confidence.

Think of it like this:

  • Every Jedi/Sith trains differently.
  • Every Jedi/Sith learns differently.
  • Every Jedi/Sith learns from a different teacher.
  • Every Jedi/Sith accesses the force differently.
  • Every Jedi/Sith will learn their way with the Force in a fashion different from every other because it is the way of the Force to be as unique to each user as their own fingerprints.

Training and techniques will cover the basics, but eventually each Jedi develops their own strengths and weaknesses based on their species limitations. This unique connection to the force almost ensures no two Jedi will ever access it in the same way.

  • Given each unique perspective to the force, Padawans are hopefully given to Masters who will harness that Padawans unique perspective of the Force.

  • Some will depend heavily upon it, using their strong precognitive abilities to predict their opponents, others will rely on their physical prowess augmented by the nature of the force on their bodies.

This is what makes combat between Jedi and Sith so potentially devastating. If two forms meet which can counter each other well, then the battle can drag on, but if the two forms are not well suited, a Jedi or Sith could find themselves immediately outmatched.

It would technically be possible for one form to counter another even though they are implemented quite differently. Imagine a Jedi who depended on his physical augmentation to increase his speed and reflexes. He doesn't predict his opponent's technique, he simply defends faster than his opponent can attack.

But how do you as the attacking Jedi know HOW you are being defended against? Is it the precognitive ability of a Jedi or the enhanced reflexes of a Jedi? Or some other unknown ability you have never seen or heard of? Guess wrong and you're dead.

This may explain the tentative nature of battles between Jedi if nothing is known about the opponent. Each is taking the measure of the other, hoping something will reveal their approach and general technique regarding their lightsaber skills and how the Force is implemented in their fighting style.

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  • I'll illustrate with a simple example. Let's assume there are four places to move a lightsaber A,B,C & D. Now let say the 1st person plans to move to A. Now 2nd player using the force also moves to A at the same time. Now would the 1st player using the force be aware of this and move his lightsaber somewhere else like B? Now a lightsaber doesn't have a concept of each player taking a turn(like chess), – William Dec 17 '15 at 6:07
  • but I guess you could say that typically one opponent reacts 1st effectively making him the attacker and the other on defense but to me the issue would still occur. On the other hand you might argue that this infinite recussion problem wouldn't occur because one is on offense and the other on defense and then it switches. I believe this is similar to the shared memory issue in Computer Science but I'm not sure. This issue would get even more complex with multiple Jedis fighting. – William Dec 17 '15 at 6:07

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