5

During the story, strange things keep happening like alien kidnappings or other events. The nature of the 'others' isn't revealed until towards the end.

I remember a question by a protagonist to the others near the end of the book goes like, "Is there intelligent life out there?" To which the response was, "Not any more, we won."

The 'Time/Spaceship' was called a 'pa' after the traditional Maori settlement, and it is implied (or maybe even stated) that a calamity was going to affect the earth and that the protagonists should head to New Zealand, thus perpetuating the timeline.

  • Not the story you are after, but the Philip K Dick short story A World of Talent also features 'others' who come from the future. – Eborbob Jan 6 '16 at 22:15
5

I believe this is Nighteyes, by Garfield Reeves-Stevens. ISBN 978-0553285031.

It involved alien abductions related to certain families.

Spoilers:

The 'aliens' were human time-travelers from the far future. An unspecified calamity (involving massive auroras) had wiped out most of the human population, with only 300 people in the New Zealand area having survived to repopulate. In the future, humanity won a war against the aliens; this is the reason for the quote about there being 'none anymore'. The humanoids in the story consisted of several types (drones, controllers, connections, slights, engineers, soldiers) who were the genetically altered human army that won the war, but they had no reproductive ability and greatly reduced emotional capacity. That is why the future humans were so disciplined and militaristic. They had mastered some forms of unknown physics totally different from what is known today, (using the fundamental principals "transference" and "placement").
The reason they were going back in time to was to gather genetic material, motherly caretakers, and historical artifacts from the world immediately before the cataclysm, whose absence wouldn't be missed (no paradoxes) as it would all have been destroyed in the cataclysm anyway. It's more complicated than that, but that's a good enough summary.

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