5

After Daniel Jackson realises the function of the 6+1 symbols on the Cartouche, a meeting takes place.

This meeting is attended by several high ranking officers. It seems to me that these 3 are the highest ranking officers - and each of them represents a different service:

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Who are they and what do we know about them (rank, service record/ribbons)?

Any and all sources are welcome - be it better images, props, extras, behind-the-scene information, novelisation or scripts.

  • 2
    No help from the novelisation; "He had been expecting a one-on-one chat over doughnuts and coffee with the notorious General West. That had seemed forbidding enough. This room, however, was crammed with both military personnel and members of the scientific staff, all of them dressed to the gills". And that's all it says. – Valorum May 8 '16 at 8:32
  • @Valorum: Is there any novelization you don't have? – ThePopMachine Jan 8 at 16:01
  • @ThePopMachine - I have about two hundred. I don't really collect non-Sci-fi ones. I'm missing the superman ones though – Valorum Jan 8 at 16:22
  • @Valorum: Which superman movies? – ThePopMachine Jan 8 at 16:23
  • @ThePopMachine - Superman III is missing from my collection and Superman Returns – Valorum Jan 8 at 17:45
2

I can find no information on their actual names/ranks, but a few things can be inferred by the color of the uniforms for the time (1994). They are not members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as the depicted ranks that are visible are not sufficient to qualify for that august board, so one would presume that they are representatives of lower commands that have an interest, or specialists in the field.

Top photo:

  • Service : United States Army
  • Rank - Major General (two stars on shoulder epaulets)
  • Blue Badge with flintlock - Combat Infantry Badge (CIB). I cannot see if there is a star at the top of the wreath, which would indicate service in combat for 30 days or combat and wounded if less than 30 days. If there is no star, it is a qualification badge rather than a merit badge
  • Silver wings on pocket - Parachute certification badge
  • Silver badge (iron cross) with dangles - Firearm marksman badge - Each dangle/bar indicates a different weapon with that status
  • Left shoulder - Unit badge (Indistinguishable)
  • Right forearm - Service slashes, awarded at a rate of one every 4 years.
  • Left chest - Ribbon bars, these represent medals awarded. There are approximately 35 available, there are ~20 on his rack. There are no medals on the right side, (Which is curious), which indicates no unit awards. They are not really clear enough to decipher with any certainty, but there are many charts/posters available.

Middle Photo

  • Service : United States Marine Corps
  • Rank - Indistinguishable
  • Left chest - Ribbon bars, also indistinguishable. There appear to be 20-25 ribbons

Bottom photo

  • Service : United States Navy
  • Rank - Indistinguishable, although the solid banding on the right lower sleeve would indicate an Admiral. Most likely either a lower half (one star), or upper half (two stars). An upper half would be noted by a slender band encircling the wrist above the thick solid band.
  • Left chest - Ribbon bars, also indistinguishable. There appear to be 28-35 ribbons
  • Left forearm - Service stripes, also one for every 4 years.
  • I often wonder how someone remembers what each one means. Is there a part of basic training that goes over what all the medals/awards/rank insignias/etc. mean? Or do you learn as you receive them? – MissouriSpartan Jan 9 at 18:21
  • 2
    @MissouriSpartan - I don't remember anything in basic that went over medals, but I was Air Force, other services may be different. You definitely learn rank insignia for your own branch, and an overview of other branches. You learn as you receive awards what each one you get means, otherwise you go look them up on a chart. (Other than the biggies, such as the Medal of Honor, DSM, DSC, bronze/silver star, etc) – JohnP Jan 9 at 20:12

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