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In Game of Thrones s05e10

Sansa Stark and Theon Greyjoy (Reek) jump off the wall of Winterfell to escape Ramsay Bolton.

In the scene the wall looked rather high and even though the ground was covered by snow, I just can not believe they would have survived that jump. Even if survival is possible, they should have had a couple broken bones, especially their legs.

So how did they make that jump and were able to keep traveling after it?

marked as duplicate by TheLethalCarrot, Chenmunka, Edlothiad, Politank-Z, fez Nov 10 '17 at 13:36

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    They could have jumped into deep soft snow – Schullz May 24 '16 at 14:25
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If you hit something that can give way slowly, the time of which you decelerate can lengthen considerably, such that the G force of impact is very minor.

During WW2 in particular, when a lot of people were jumping out of planes, many people were documented to have survived falling from extreme heights. Usually they landed into piles of snow or soft muddy river banks.

A jump from the ramparts would have been at even less speed and impact than that. So basically, no magic physics is required, its certainly believable to survive without major injury.

To my mind, the biggest question is, what they did after they jumped. I would have thought they would have to bury themselves until night fall, as even the most basic of guardsmen would see two people running across a white snow plain.

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With the constant snow and wind, a large drift would gather on the outside of the wall. The inside would be shielded from wind drifts and be packed down or removed from inhabitants. There would essentially be no need to remove snow drifts from the outside, so theoretically, one could surmise that when they jumped, they landed in deep snow. Imagine jumping into those large snow drift piles in a parking lot after snowplows went through, not jumping into a foot or so of freshly fallen snow in your yard.

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