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Can any one explain to me why, in Terminator 2: Judgment Day the T-800 robot tries to protect John Connor, and who programmed the T-800's systems to be good before sending him from the future. As we all know in the first movie, the Terminator / T-800 tries to kill Sarah Connor before she gave birth to John Connor.

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    All this is explained in the movie. The T-800 was reprogrammed by John Conner in the future and then send back in time with the mission to protect him. The T-800 in the 1st movie was sent by Skynet. – Dennis_E Jun 22 '16 at 10:11
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    @PointlessSpike - He's a "Cyberdyne Systems Model 101" T-800 Terminator.; scifi.stackexchange.com/a/67865/20774 – Valorum Jun 22 '16 at 10:56
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    Yeah, the 800 is the type (i.e. what capabilities it has), the 101 the model (what it looks like). AFAIK the one in T3 was a different T number, but still the same model 101. – Mr Lister Jun 22 '16 at 15:07
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    @MrLister - If he rolls it back to what it looked like before (e.g. badly written and lacking basic grammar and punctuation), it would be an act of self-vandalism. – Valorum Jun 22 '16 at 20:18
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    @RANSARA009 - They're not downvoting because I improved the grammar, punctuation, spelling and made it clearer what you're asking. They're downvoting because they think the question lacks research effort on your part. – Valorum Jun 22 '16 at 20:20
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The T800 in Terminator 2 is not the same T800 from the first film.

This one was reprogrammed by... I think it was John's future wife to protect him as a kid (don't quote me on that, it might be Terminator 3 I'm thinking of there).

The sole purpose of it at this point became protection of John Conner, not termination of him.

The reason it was a T800... I don't know. in T3 it is used because it is familiar to John from T2, but I don't know why in T2.

If I recall correctly this was said in the film by the T800 himself. You'd need to confirm it as I don't remember but yeah. I want to say it was shortly after they saved John's mum (I forgot her name) from the insane asylum, when they're trying to remove/replace some processor chip or something.

Turns out the scene I'm thinking of is a deleted scene.

  • You're thinking of Terminator 3. – Valorum Jun 22 '16 at 20:20
  • @Valorum Yeah... thanks for the heads up on that one. It has been way too long since I watched films in general. Last one I saw was Rush and that aint sci-fi. '^^ Also, your name. How're things going since Palpatine nicked your seat as chancellor? – Alex Spencer Jun 23 '16 at 8:17
  • I'll be honest, it's been rough. On the plus side, I've had more time to improve my hypergolf handicap. – Valorum Jun 23 '16 at 8:27
  • @Valorum I love people with a sense of humour :P Oh well. Better luck next time. You're on the right stack exchange with that name though! Anyway these comments are going off topic a bit (thats me for you) so seeya – Alex Spencer Jun 23 '16 at 8:29
  • The reason it was a T800 could be simple - it's the best kind of robot the humanity laid their hands on and could reprogram to their needs. – styrofoam fly Feb 10 '17 at 21:26
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This is explicitly stated in T2. Future John reprogrammed a different T-800 (e.g. not the one that tried to kill his mother in 'The Terminator', but the same model) to protect himself as a child.

TERMINATOR: My mission is to protect you.

JOHN: Yeah? Who sent you?

TERMINATOR: You did. Thirty years from now you reprogrammed me to be your protector here, in this time.

Purely as an aside, you may wish to note (from Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles) that killing John Connor is a hard-wired function of the Terminator chip and can't be removed from their programming. It can, however, be overridden through a software patch.

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  • Hold on... in Genisys, they didn't kill Connor. Does that mean they had to rewrite the chip to accommodate their plan? – PointlessSpike Jun 22 '16 at 11:30
  • @PointlessSpike - I'm at a loss how to answer this without a massive spoiler so for those who haven't seen the film, look away now. John = Not John – Valorum Jun 22 '16 at 11:32
  • @Valorum- I suppose it's a matter of interpretation and they may have just decided exactly that – PointlessSpike Jun 22 '16 at 11:36
  • @PointlessSpike - Genisys didn't treat The Sarah Connor Chronicles as canon, only T1 and T2. – Hypnosifl Jun 22 '16 at 12:32
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In T2 the terminators programmed mission is the protection and survival of John Conner. This is neither good or bad because the Terminator isn't choosing to do this and has no emotions, only a directive to not fail its mission. Early in the movie John discovers that the terminator must obey his orders. When a couple of tough looking big guys insult and try to intimidate John he tells the terminator " hey grab that guy" the terminator complies and then the second guy attacks him. In an instant the terminator has both men on their knee while pulling out his 45 cal auto and is about to shoot one of the men in the head when John grabs his hand making him miss by an inch. john says " Jesus, you were gonna kill that guy " the terminator replies " of course I'm a Terminator". This action is also neither good or bad because the Terminator is only following mission parameters. In the aftermath John orders the terminator to not kill anyone. John tries to explain that you can't go around killing people but the point is totally lost on the terminator although he will obey the order not to kill as it is now a new directive.
The point I'm trying to make is that the Terminator has no feelings or emotions at all and actions undertaken by him that would be termed good if done by a human simply don't apply to a terminator. One of his sub routines is human psychology so in a way he understands human actions but another of his sub routines is human anatomy, and both are used for the same purpose. To make him a more efficient killer.

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