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I'm almost 100% positive this one comes from the mid-late 1970s.

The story starts off in a crowded elevator, with the protagonist (a young woman, probably in her early 20's) fretting about various things. She's chiding herself for having garlic bread with her lunch, as she's feeling a bit bloated and is sure the other passengers can smell her garlic breath. She is mortified when she looks down and notices her ugly big toe has pushed through a tear in her pantyhose. That sort of thing.

She gets off at the floor where the therapist she is going to meet is. As mentioned before, the therapist is actually a computer programmed to counsel people. A series of Q&A's between the woman and the computer ensue. IIRC, the course of the conversation becomes somewhat comical, and the computer-therapist becomes a bit perplexed at some of the responses.

The woman leaves the session feeling great about herself. The things that bothered her previously she now sees in a positive light. Her exposed toe is akin to a blossom pushing up from the earth and showing itself (or something like that). In the elevator down, a handsome man next to her notes she had Italian food for lunch (due to the garlic breath). She flashes him a smile, says "you should try my lasagna", and suggests a dinner date.

Meanwhile, in the final paragraph, the computer-therapist is going through a litany of humorous self-queries, all of them indicative of newly-found insecurities. The healer has become the patient, so to speak.

6

The story is Transference, by the late Sharon Webb. The story appeared in the July, 1980 issue of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. I found my copy of the issue in my attic. I have been unable to find the story online.

The protagonist's name is Marilyn Taylor, a nervous 30-something with a therapy appointment with a computerized therapist designed by Allied Meditronics. The details are pretty much as I remembered them.

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