2

My real question can be broken down into these two parts:

Is it possible for Lurchers and Coinshots to push/pull specific parts of one metal object? Or, to make it easier, two metal objects welded (or something) together?

If so, is it possible and/or practical to use Lurcher/Coinshot teams for blacksmithing if a forge isn't available?

4

It is possible to Push or Pull on specific parts of a metal object, yes.

Kelsier grabbed the bars, flaring both steel and iron, Pushing against one tip of each bar and Pulling against the opposite tip.

  • Mistborn: The Final Empire, Chapter 34 [Kelsier's fight with the Inquisitor]

However, Kelsier is unusually skilled with Iron and Steel.

"This is his specialty - Pushing and Pulling with expert control."

-same chapter [Vin thinking about Kelsier]

Also, from a 2008 interview with Brandon Sanderson:

sporkify (18 October 2008)
How much control do Allomancers have over pushing and pulling metals?

Brandon Sanderson (20 October 2008)
Depends on the Allomancer. Zane and Kelsier were both unusually skilled in this area, and represent the higher end of what is possible.

  • Nice! I guess the rules are a little different from Forging, then. – Adamant Nov 4 '16 at 3:47
  • It is also likely that the principles mentioned by Mat do matter, but that (as with, for example, Pushing and Pulling metal inside someone’s body) they aren’t absolute. – Adamant Nov 4 '16 at 3:54
  • Actually, I doubt they apply for this power. Forgery is the most Spiritual Realm heavy Cosmere magic we've seen; Iron and Steel are Physical Allomancy. EDIT: Inquisitors can see blue lines to individual bits of metal in a human's body, and we know a human is Cognitively (and presumably Spiritually) one thing. (And it's not Inquisitor specific; in theory this power can be learned by any Coinshot/Lurcher/Mistborn according to the annotations.) – cometaryorbit Nov 4 '16 at 5:33
3

Kind of. According to a passage in Emperor’s Soul which describes forging, the object will eventually consider itself one part, so that means it would be impossible to separate.

“Here is the point. The longer an object exists as a whole, and the longer it is seen in that state, the stronger its sense of complete identity becomes. That table is made up of various pieces of wood fitted together, but do we think of it that way? No. We see the whole.

“To Forge the table, I must understand it as a whole. The same goes for a wall. That wall has existed long enough to view itself as a single entity. I could, perhaps, have attacked each block separately—they might still be distinct enough—but doing so would be difficult, as the wall wants to act as a whole.”

The Emperor’s Soul

if a Push or Pull acts on the center of mass of an object, and the object considers itself a whole, you might have difficulty pushing and pulling on separate portions in order to shape the object precisely. (It may not be explicitly said where a push or pull acts, but the behavior is consistent with a COM force. (suggested by @Adamant)

  • 1
    This is quite true. Would you mind if I added the quote that illustrates this? – Adamant Nov 3 '16 at 22:28
  • @Adamant ninja'd! – CHEESE Nov 3 '16 at 22:29
  • @CHEESE - Are you adding the quote, then? – Adamant Nov 3 '16 at 22:30
  • 1
    Im sure you could bend them by putting enough pressure on a certain spot, but it would be impossible if not completely impractical to make weapons and tools like that. – Matrim Cauthon Nov 3 '16 at 22:38
  • 1
    @CHEESE - Well, if a Push or Pull acts on the center of mass of an object, and the object considers itself a whole, you might have difficulty pushing and pulling on separate portions in order to shape the object precisely. (It may not be explicitly said where a push or pull acts, but the behavior is consistent with a COM force). – Adamant Nov 3 '16 at 22:38

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