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Just watched the Immortals, and the titans are portrayed as simpleton creatures, more like "zombies" which kill, yet in Hercules (the Walt Disney) production the titans are earth, wind, fire and ice, and yet in another movie I am trying to remember the title there is a titan beast from the underworld (crustacean) or something like that.

What is the true representation of the titans?

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  • I like this question – Daft Mar 7 '15 at 17:39
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The original representation of Titans was from Greek myth. The Titans were effectively the first gods - the twelve children of Gaia and Uranus, the representations of the earth and the sky respectively. They ruled in a mythic prehistoric age until being overthrown by Zeus, a son of two of the Titans (Cronus and Rhea).

They were generally portrayed in Greek and later art as being humanoid although often larger of stature than your average man, similar to most Greek gods.

Examples include Cronus and Rhea:

Cronus and Rhea

Atlas and Prometheus:

Atlas and Prometheus

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In Greek mythology, Titans were not supposed to be beasts. They were just like the Olympian gods but they came before and actually gave birth to the Olympian gods. None of the movies or shows that you mentioned are accurate because they were all shown as some sort of scary monsters. Not all of the Titans were actually evil. The Greek god Zeus dethroned his father, the Titan king Cronos, and banned all Titans who sided with him to Tartarus, a prison used for judging and torturing wicked souls after death. Two of the Titans, Themis and Prometheus, actually sided with Zeus and became Olympian gods.

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In the original mythology, the Titans look just like Giants… And like the Gods, actually, as the Olympian gods are actually titans with great powers (Zeus is the son of Cronos, the king of the Titans, in the original mythology).

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