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HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS

There's a specific part in this book explaining...

Harry hearing the voices but actually was a hissing of a snake.

Harry hearing the words kill and rip.

Harry being filled with panic as he tries to find whether that voice he heard is trying to kill someone or not.

Ron and Hermione explaining that hearing voices in the wizarding world is not a good sign.

A part of the book contains the information of Harry hearing voices. When Harry received a detention after being caught on a night walk, Ron was told by Professor McGonagall to help Filch in polishing and cleaning the trophies in the trophy room.

And one time, a form of wizard duel was held, the coordinators were Lockhart and Snape (assistant). When Draco casted the

marked as duplicate by SQB, CHEESE, BCdotWEB, Jason Baker, Chenmunka Dec 2 '16 at 14:28

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    I think I understand where you're going with this, but your sentence got cut off. – SQB Dec 2 '16 at 12:55
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    I'm almost certain the answer will be because Harry's a Parselmouth, but that still doesn't really explain why he heard things that others didn't. He didn't get super-hearing to go with his other fancy powers. To be honest, I'm starting to think that there are a lot of weird things in HP that just don't make any sense. If it weren't for the "Because Magic" excuse, JK would be sunk. – DisturbedNeo Dec 2 '16 at 13:16
  • @CHEESE looks like it, yes. – SQB Dec 2 '16 at 14:01
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Clear speech and words are much easier to pick out from background noise than random hissing. We don't always notice it, but we're always surrounded by something that could be making some kind of hissing noise - plumbing, wind, indistinct people talking in the distance, footsteps as people move....the list goes on.

This is especially true in a place like Hogwarts, where you have an entire student body, an old castle, stairways moving by themselves, and paintings constantly chatting to one another.

For Harry, that particular hissing formed distinct words. If it hadn't been for Harry yelling about hearing voices, and Hermione and Ron therefore listening as hard as they could for voices, others might have heard the hissing of the basilisk more distinctly; as it was, they were listening for the wrong thing.

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