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This question came up in a discussion on another question about Jedi Force Ghosts.

Was Obi-Wan the first Jedi to transform bodily into a Force Ghost?

On various other questions, people have made various (and contradictory) claims about Jedi knowledge and Force Ghosts.

Some have said the Jedi knew nothing about Force Ghosts and therefore individuals don't retain their personality after death, and that even the Sith doubted the ability to become one with the Force after death. Accepting this answer means that Obi-Wan was the first to transform his body into the Force.

Another question has an answer claiming Darth Vader learned the technique from Darth Sidious. Which would mean others have transformed bodily into the Force before Obi-Wan. (Nota Bene: The source novel for that claim, Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader, is not on the list of canon Star Wars works.)

And then there is an answer here that claims both Jedi and Sith knew of becoming Force Ghosts after death, but that the Sith rejected this method of immortality. This would imply Obi-Wan was not the first to convert his body into a Force Ghost. The knowledge for that claim comes from the novel, Darth Plagueis, which is non-canon. If that novel was declared canon, it would contradict other parts of G-canon.

Can anybody provide a real canon answer about the history of Force Ghosts?

I am looking for answers from G-canon, not lower canon levels.

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    G-canon is the stupidest level of canon. Disney purged SW:TOR, while the latter rivals any wiki when it comes to explaining stuff. – Gallifreyan Dec 27 '16 at 18:23
  • Not sure if it's canon, but I watched a video on I believe the "Clone Wars" and it mentioned that Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan found a secret Jedi temple where they learned how to obtain this ability. I am unsure if Yoda learned this from either of them, or what. There were probably many who knew of this technique, but how many were shown? – XaolingBao Dec 27 '16 at 20:38
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    The heck is g canon? Sounds kinky. – The Nate Dec 30 '16 at 4:19
  • @TheNate G-canon means "George Lucas canon". G-canon means any movies made by Lucas, any comments he made in interviews, any tv shows he made, and any stories he endorsed are considered official Star Wars. Ideas and characters mentioned in the Expanded Universe or fandom are not considered official unless those ideas are also mentioned in G-canon stories. – RichS Dec 30 '16 at 4:21
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This may be cheating, but Qui-Gon appeared to Obi-Wan (and Anakin) on planet Mortis in Star Wars: The Clone Wars season 3, episode 15, Overlords.

enter image description here

Qui-Gon was only able to appear there because of the planet's exceptionally strong connection to the Force, which is why I call this cheating.

George Lucas has addressed the canonicity of Clone Wars in an interview, as cited in this answer:

This is Star Wars, and I don’t make a distinction between [Clone Wars] and the films

So if you're not cool with the Disney canon system, here's the Word of God.

  • Obi-Wan could only do it because he learned it from Qui-Gon (as Yoda confirms at the end of Revenge of the Sith). So, Mortis or no Mortis, the answer should really be Qui-Gon. – The Dark Lord Dec 27 '16 at 22:49
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    Yeah, this certainly counts as cheating! To provide a direct quote from George Lucas, "We never see the ghost of Qui-Gon; he's not that accomplished. He's able to retain his personality, but he's not able to become a corporal ghost." – RichS Dec 28 '16 at 1:12
  • @RichS - you just answered your question yourself. Given that GL was directly engaged in 6 films only, Obi must be the first. On the other hand, G-Canon is obsolete. According to Disney, the Clone Wars are canon. – Gallifreyan Dec 28 '16 at 17:37
  • @RichS - updated my answer with a quote from GL. – Gallifreyan Jan 1 '17 at 14:09
  • Same answer here – Gallifreyan Jan 5 '17 at 19:15
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We don't know, if Qui-Gon appeared to Yoda as Force-Ghost in Revenge of the Sith. Yoda tells Obi-Wan that Qui-Gon "has learned the path to immortality." Maybe Qui-Gon appeared to Yoda the way Obi-Wan appeared to Luke in Star Wars - A New Hope and to Yoda in The Empire Strikes Back - without a visible body. The first time we ever see a dead Jedi become visible is on Hoth.

  • The Clone Wars predate the events of the RotS. – Gallifreyan Dec 27 '16 at 19:08
  • @Gallifreian RichS is specifically looking for answers from G-canon and The Clone Wars aren't G-canon according to the list of canon Star Wars works (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars_canon). – Marvin Falz Dec 28 '16 at 12:36
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    How is "The Clone Wars" not G-canon according to the old rating system? Lucas is the creator, writer, and executive producer for the entire series. – Ellesedil May 17 '17 at 19:11

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