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I read the story in an anthology kind of magazine. I can't remember the name. I read the story between 1982 and 1987, I guess. What I do remember was the fact that the tree was vulnerable in the early years. He witnessed a lot of his peers perish, due to animals browsing them excessively. Or floods, fires. He was burned himself too, but not destroyed. When he matured enough, his bulk was sufficient to keep him alive.

And I believe that he had a few tricks up his stem which our earthly trees are not capable off. He had a kind of telepathic link with the animals and other trees around him. As he grew older this power extended until it spanned his total planet. By the way, by then he was one of the few of his race, still alive. If I remember correctly, when the tree was young, he was mobile and ran around the country. When he matured he chose a nice place to take root and saw ages come and go. All the while his intelligence grew.

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    This seems very terse. Do you think that you could add some more details? Any little bit is helpful. – Mithical Jan 2 '17 at 22:30
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    Welcome to Science Fiction & Fantasy! Please try to add anything that may help identification. Review this checklist. When did you read it? What language was it in? Are there any other plot details you remember or descriptions of scenes or characters you can give? Anything at all? Feel free to edit any additional details into the question. – Paulie_D Jan 2 '17 at 22:34
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    Thanks @Paulie_D. I added some details which came back to me. The story was written in English, if I am not mistaken. The magazine was like kind of an introduction to Science Fiction. There were more short stories in there, but this story stuck out. I have no recollection of the writer nor the title of the story :-( – Maurice Stella Jan 3 '17 at 0:54
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    +1 for a few tricks up his stem. – Möoz Jan 3 '17 at 1:11
  • I was going to ask if the story is set on another planet, but I see you hinted in that direction when you mentioned "our earthly trees". OK, it's an alien tree on alien planet. Question: Do earthmen show up in the story, or is it all about aliens? – user14111 Jan 3 '17 at 2:09
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I believe this story may be “The Harmoniser” by A.E. van Vogt. This concerns a (somewhat) sentient tree - the ibis tree - that a powerful alien civilisation had bred to end conflicts.

I read the story in an anthology kind of magazine.

It was first published in Astounding in 1944, but was later anthologised in “Away and Beyond” and “Transfinite: The Essential A.E. van Vogt”.

And I believe that he had a few tricks up his stem which our earthly trees are not capable off. He had a kind of telepathic link with the animals and other trees around him.

When the tree detected negative emotions it would produce pheromones that would pacify the aggressor. A ship carrying the tree crashed on the Earth 80 million years ago, and some of the specimens survived (although the aliens tried to destroy as many as possible before they crashed, knowing that the trees could greatly harm the development of the planet). As the ibis tree flourished in its new surroundings, a tyrannosaurus fought a brontosaurus nearby:

The initial reactions had begun almost at the moment the dinosaur arrived in the vicinity. Every sensitive colloid of the tree caught the blasts of palpable lusts radiated by the killer… their effect on the delicately balanced films’ of the ibis’ membranes was to set off a feverish manufacture of acids. The ibis tree and its companions exuded a fragrance in the form of billions on billions of tiny dust motes. Some of these motes drifted down to the dinosaur, and were gulped down into its lungs from where, in due course, they were absorbed into its bloodstream.

The effect was that carnivorous dinosaurs stopped killing, and died from starvation. Without population checks the herbivores increased in numbers, and in turn ran out of food and starved. This was the Cretaceous mass extinction.

By the way, by then he was one of the few of his race, still alive.

Eighty-three of the trees survived the crash.

He witnessed a lot of his peers perish, due to animals browsing them excessively. Or floods, fires. He was burned himself too, but not destroyed.

The tree was caught in an earthquake and buried:

A continent was rift and torn. The gap was almost a thousand miles long, and in such places as much as twenty-five miles deep. It cut the edge of the island, and plummeted the ibis tree into an abyss three miles deep. Water raged into the hole, and dirt came roaring down in almost liquid torrents. Shocked and buried, the ibis tree succumbed to its new environment. It sank rapidly to the state of a root struggling to remain alive against a hostile force.

Earth was visited by the aliens soon after to dispose of the trees, as their presence would effect the natural evolution of the planet. Because that ibis tree had been buried so deep though, they did not find it. Eventually, many millions of years later, it managed to grow again, in a garden of a soldier and his family. It witnessed the soldier’s angry response to the bomb damage of his house

and less than an hour later began to give off a beautiful perfume.

Soon after, World War III ended.

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4

I'm going to propose that the OP is thinking of Hybrid by Keith Laumer.

Summary from here

Nine by Laumer (1967) is a collection of short stories accompanied by an essay in which Harlan Ellison rather effusively calls him the best new science fiction writer since Kurt Vonnegut. The opening story is "Hybrid", in which roving space travelers find a fallen tree that is actually an alien intelligence that transforms itself from animal to plant late in its life cycle. One of them becomes host to the tree's offspring/spores in return for extended life and an improved physiology.

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