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We all have watched the movies and hopefully read the books.

I am curious, why did Harry befriend Professor Lupin, knowing his "uncontrollable" condition?

I, for one, cannot find any reason for Harry to do so.

However, we see that Professor Lupin was, amongst many others, against Voldemort. Based on this fact, Harry and Lupin could form an alliance of sorts - but this was no temporary alliance between them, this was friendship.

I am aware of the fact that Lupin knew Lily, Harry's mother, however this is no real catalyst for a friendship between two people, especially when there is also a large age gap (+15 years at least).

What sparked this bond between them?

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    Didn't Harry befriend Lupin before knowing of his condition? Also, given Lupin's behavior in both the books and the movies, he seems like prime mentor/friend material. What is the source of your confusion? – Adele C Jan 28 '17 at 1:27
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    Do you dislike people just because they're different? – user46509 Jan 28 '17 at 9:09
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    Because he is a noble git? – Aniket Chowdhury Jan 31 '17 at 15:31
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I think the question is rather, "Why wouldn't they be friends given all that they have in common?". There are plenty of factors that contributed to their friendship. I've tried to answer this fairly comprehensively but I'm sure there's elements I've missed. The fact that Lupin was a werewolf never affected their friendship; if anything, it strengthened it.

What they had in common

  • As Torsten Link mentions, Lupin was close friends with Harry's father, James. Apart from the traitor Pettigrew, Harry was very close with his father's two other school-friends. Lupin himself saw a lot of his close friend James in Harry (as did Sirius), and that contributed to their friendship.

    “But you are normal!” said Harry fiercely. “You’ve just got a — a problem —”
    Lupin burst out laughing. “Sometimes you remind me a lot of James. He called it my ‘furry little problem’ in company.
    (Half-Blood Prince, Chapter 16, A Very Frosty Christmas).

  • Like Harry, Lupin had a very lonely childhood. Because he was a werewolf Lupin's parents kept him away from other children.

    Remus was not allowed to play with other children, in case he let slip the truth of his condition. In consequence, and in spite of his loving parents, he was a very lonely boy.
    (Pottermore, "Remus Lupin").

    Harry too had a very lonely upbringing. He spent much of his early years being bullied by Dudley, which prevented him from having any real friends. Lupin knew what that feels like.

  • Like Harry, Lupin was an outsider at school. Harry may have been famous but that actually isolated him from his peers. He was used to being the unwanted centre of attention - the muffled whispers, people pointing at his scar etc. Lupin was an outsider because of his condition. Because Harry and Lupin both know what it's like to be isolated at Hogwarts they are both more open to becoming friends with outsiders like Peter Pettigrew and Luna Lovegood.

    Remus, always the underdog’s friend, was kind to short and rather slow Peter Pettigrew, a fellow Gryffindor... He was, as ever, particularly drawn to the underdog, and both Neville Longbottom and Harry Potter benefited from his wisdom and kindness.
    (Pottermore, "Remus Lupin").

  • They were both particularly brave. Harry recognised this trait in Lupin.

    “I’d never have believed this,” Harry said. “The man who taught me to fight Dementors — a coward.”
    (Deathly Hallows, Chapter 11, The Bribe).

    Although Harry is fighting with Lupin here it underscores that he thinks that Lupin is usually brave. He believes that he's showing uncharacteristic cowardice. He believes that Lupin's behaviour is usually typified by selfless bravery. Harry has this in spades.

The circumstances of their friendship

  • Lupin saved Harry from a Dementor in their first meeting. This is a pretty solid basis for any friendship. Harry was grateful for Lupin's help and from then on their relationship became stronger than that of a teacher and pupil.

  • Lupin was a generally popular teacher anyway.

    “He’s the best Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher we’ve ever had,” said Dean Thomas boldly, and there was a murmur of agreement from the rest of the class.
    (Prisoner of Azkaban, Chapter 9, Grim Defeat).

    It wasn't as if liking Lupin was out-of-the-ordinary. He was a very popular teacher. Only snobs like Malfoy didn't like him.

  • Lupin taught Harry how to cast a Patronus. This meant that they spent a lot of time with one another outside of their ordinary DADA lessons. The combination of that time alone and the personal content of those lessons (like Harry sharing that he was hearing echoes of the deaths of his parents) meant that the pair formed a strong bond. They got to know one another personally and became friends.

  • As the question says, they fought together in the Order of the Phoenix. Having a common cause and fighting alongside someone often creates a unique bond. Lupin and Harry were fellow-soldiers, effectively. They knew what it was like to put their lives in one another's hands. It was Lupin who tried to hold Harry back when he saw his own close friend Sirius die in the Ministry. They fought together. They grieved together.

  • Lupin asked Harry to be his son's godfather. This solidified what was already a strong friendship. They were now not only friends but family.

  • Harry summoned Lupin from the Resurrection Stone. He wouldn't have done this if he didn't view Lupin as one of the most important people in his life.

About Lupin being a werewolf

  • Because he was a raised by Muggles Harry didn't inherit the prejudice of other wizards. Compare the attitude of Harry when he finds out that Lupin is a werewolf to Ron's. Ron, who has been raised as a wizard, is disgusted by him.

    Lupin made toward him, looking concerned, but Ron gasped, “Get away from me, werewolf!
    (Prisoner of Azkaban, Chapter 17, Cat, Rat and Dog).

    Harry, on the other hand, is not particularly bothered about whether or not Lupin is a werewolf. He does get very animated, though, when he thinks that Lupin has been conspiring with the man who betrayed his parents.

    “Some of the staff thought so,” said Lupin. “He had to work very hard to convince certain teachers that I’m trustworthy —”
    “AND HE WAS WRONG!” Harry yelled. “YOU VE BEEN HELPING HIM ALL THE TIME!” He was pointing at Black...
    (Prisoner of Azkaban, Chapter 17, Cat, Rat and Dog).

    Harry doesn't have any prejudice towards werewolves. Obviously, the Dursleys didn't impress any such views on him. He cares about family and loyalty, not species prejudice. If anything, Harry is quite naive about the way in which other witches and wizards view werewolves. Lupin has to explain the hatred that other people have for him and his kind.

    “You have only ever seen me amongst the Order, or under Dumbledore’s protection at Hogwarts! You don’t know how most of the Wizarding world sees creatures like me! When they know of my affliction, they can barely talk to me!"
    (Deathly Hallows, Chapter 11, The Bribe).

    If anything, Lupin's condition reinforced his identity as an outsider which, as I argue above, was a key part of their bond in the first place.

  • The friendship bit, I'd like to add this - he eased the internal struggle and weakness Harry felt with himself when confronted with a dementor. - "there are horrors in your past that the others don't have." – cst1992 Jul 9 '17 at 13:56
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First of all: as said in the comment Harry did like Lupin even before he knew what he was.

And if you read the book, you should have seen, that he was one of the two best friends of Harry's father.

How should he not be a good friend of someone so close to his beloved parents.

In addition: Lupin fights for the order, fights for him and protects him whenever possible. He even trains him in casting a patronus, what is a very useful ability that not very much pupils are able to do.

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    Also, I'm really perplexed by the kind of thinking that goes into this question. "Why would he befriend this guy who has a medical condition? What does he get out of it?" – starpilotsix Jan 28 '17 at 2:07

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