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This question got me wondering what murder of Lily Potter cost Voldemort. Yes, Snape became a double agent. So what? Snape still did all of Voldemort's bidding. And, as far as I know, Snape never hindered Voldemort's path (even if he was assigned by Dumbledore to protect Hogwarts students, I don't think he would have dared stop the dark lord if ever tried to kill a student).

If Voldemort really had stupefied Lily Potter, how would things be different from Voldemort's perspective? Could dead Voldemort (his soul) have regretted his action of killing Lily Potter, assuming a dead man knows everything?

closed as primarily opinion-based by calccrypto, TGnat, Möoz, Ward, Aegon Apr 26 '17 at 8:02

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This is not an opinion based question, this question is asking whether there's evidence as to what extent Snape hindered Voldemort and whether had simply stunned her would Snape have been of a much greater use than he was? – Edlothiad Apr 26 '17 at 4:37
  • @Edlothiad I beg to differ. If Voldemort really had stupefied Lily Potter, how would things be different from Voldemort's perspective? and Could dead Voldemort (his soul) have regretted his action of killing Lily Potter, assuming a dead man knows everything is the definition of POB and Opinion-based debate – Aegon Apr 26 '17 at 8:05
  • @Aegon I see your point, either way, the people decided. – Edlothiad Apr 26 '17 at 8:41
  • Without Snape, Harry wouldn't have been master of the Elder Wand, and Voldemort would presumably have won their final battle. That was kind of unplanned though. – Harry Johnston Apr 26 '17 at 12:29
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Technically, Snape did do Voldemort's bidding, but he typically did it in ways that were subtly (or not-so-subtly) undermining to Voldemort's purposes, such as

the fact that he planted the idea for Harry Potter's transfer on the Order.

Technically, he gave Voldemort correct information (such as the real date of the event), which was enough to divert suspicion from him, but obviously his information was incomplete to say the least.

He was also able to protect the students at Hogwarts to some degree (e.g. witness the fact that he sent Ginny Weasley to do detention with Hagrid in the Forbidden Forest instead of being subjected to the Cruciatus Curse).

Perhaps the most significant example, of course, was

the fact that he smuggled the Sword of Gryffindor to Harry Potter so they could destroy the Locket horcrux with it.

Dumbledore also implied in the 5th book that Snape gave him some rather critical information. It's not specified exactly what that was, but

presumably it included (among other things) the fact that the Potters were being targeted by Voldemort

Also closely related: What concrete aid did Severus Snape provide the Order while he was under cover?

It's also worth noting that, due to the fact that the Trio was traveling with a portrait of Phineas Nigellus Black, Snape was able to pass them information and keep tabs on them at the same time. In fact, there were times where he appeared to have known more about Harry Potter's whereabouts and activities than the Order itself.

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    How is helping Ginny a damage to Voldemort? – I Love You 3000 Apr 26 '17 at 6:03
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    @ILoveYou That one was probably less directly damaging to Voldemort, but it's still illustration of how Snape typically did Voldemort's bidding in ways that were subtly undermining – EJS Apr 26 '17 at 18:52

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