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This question has been bothering me ever since I watched the ending of the fourth episode of season 7 (The Spoils of War).

Jaime charges towards Daenerys and Drogon. He is charging along the bank of a river; so, it seems that the water is obviously not that deep (maybe ~0.1 Jaime Lannister). Now, someone hurls him from his horse and they fall into the water, and suddenly, the river seems deeper than seven Jaime Lannisters (see below screenshot).

The point at which he falls isn't that far from where the horse was riding along the bank. So my question is - do real rivers behave like this? That kind of gradient seems scary if it can be real. And if so, does anyone know of any particular rivers that might do this?

enter image description here

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    Funny, I had the same question – Möoz Aug 9 '17 at 2:17
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    Also, your question title doesn't quite match up with the body. Are you asking whether the final sequence is Jaime hallucinating or whether similarly deep-near-the-bank rivers exist in our real world? – Möoz Aug 9 '17 at 2:18
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    I like that you measure the river's depth in Jaimes :D – Gallifreyan Aug 9 '17 at 8:10
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    The Patuxent river drops about 80 feet in 2 meters which is quite a scary drop. They exist but are likely quite rare. Blackwater rush has been described as a VERY deep river. Although I don't think the speed of the drop has been described. – Edlothiad Aug 9 '17 at 8:51
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    @Edlothiad: Though not explicitly described, it is called the Blackwater Rush. I would infer that it's a fast flowing river; which would mean that it erodes relatively quickly and could easily create a deep ditch profile (assuming a straight part of the river). – Flater Aug 9 '17 at 9:44
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Here is a sample river cross-section from the coolgeography.co.uk articles on meanders and floodplains.

enter image description here

So yes, not only can this type of river exist, children are even taught about it in school.

  • Lucky for Jaime he was on the right side of it! – Rohit Pandey Aug 9 '17 at 6:33
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    Firstly, this only occurs at bends in the river, and 2 is a very simplified version of a river cross-section. This actually is a mockery of what a river cross-section actually looks like. Oh yeah merge your accounts! – Edlothiad Aug 9 '17 at 8:24
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    You can look here for not only more children's drawings as have been provided, but also actual plots of data from real rivers showing what real river banks look like. – Edlothiad Aug 9 '17 at 8:27
  • +1 For using an image from a text book I used whilst at school – TheLethalCarrot Aug 9 '17 at 14:42
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    Well this river cliff does not look like the one in the serie. There is no cliff in the scene, the horses are already in the water and it is not deep. – user88795 Aug 21 '17 at 13:22
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Is the river that Jaime falls into real?

Yes and we can clearly see it in a few of the shots from before Jaime falls into the water.

Jaime and Bronn look over the supply train
Jaime and Bronn look over the supply train

Drogon burns the supplies next to the river
Drogon burns the supplies next to the river

As for where your confusion comes from well it actually appears to be a mistake on the show's part as Jaime is clearly seen before falling in riding through very shallow water.

Jaime charges Drogon and Dany
Jaime charges Drogon and Dany

When they manage to dodge Drogon's fire they then fall into what still appears to be shallow water.

Jaime and Bronn fall into the river
Jaime and Bronn fall into the river

Then when we see Jaime start sinking it is all of a sudden extremely deep and Bronn is nowhere to be seen. Though of course he might be at the surface still seeing as he could swim.

Jaime drowning
Jaime drowning


On an anecdotal note my grandma's house backs onto a river and we used to jump off the garden into it all the time and it was very deep and this was on a straight and at the edge.

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