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This question already has an answer here:

What was that Science Fiction story about the (what we would today call) "smart house" that made breakfast every morning for the owner, had a list of activities, etc. But the owners had died (in a nuclear war - can't remember) centuries before.

marked as duplicate by FuzzyBoots story-identification Oct 23 '17 at 11:08

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  • @Danny3414 we don’t close Story IDquestions unless we have a confirmation from the op that the same book is in fact the answer, otherwise we can’t be certain it is indeed a duplicate. – Edlothiad Oct 23 '17 at 5:10
  • Probably the same book as Identify a short story about post-apocalyptic household robots – John Rennie Oct 23 '17 at 9:43
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    I'm guessing it probably wasn't this one. – The Dark Lord Oct 23 '17 at 10:01
  • Since this was self-confirmed with the person asking the question providing the answer, I have marked this as a duplicate. In about 41 hours, they can accept. – FuzzyBoots Oct 23 '17 at 11:09
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I think I've found the answer to my own question. It looks like the 1950 Ray Bradbury short story, "There Will Come Soft Rains," which has its own Wikipedia page that includes this description:

The story begins by introducing the reader to a computer-controlled house that cooks, cleans, and takes care of virtually every need that a well-to-do United States family could be assumed to have. The reader enters the text on the morning of April 28, 1985 (changed to August 4, 2026 in later printings), and follows the house through some of the daily tasks that it performs as it prepares its inhabitants for a day of work. At first, it is not apparent that anything is out of the ordinary, but eventually it becomes clear that the residents of the house are not present, and that the house is empty. While no direct explanation of the nonexistence of the family is produced, the silhouettes of a man, a woman, two children, and their play ball are described as having been burnt into one side of the house, implying that they were all incinerated by the thermal flash of a nuclear weapon.

Thanks to anyone who was looking for an answer.

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    Yes,it is its one of the sf greats (both the author and the story). – Gnudiff Oct 23 '17 at 7:15

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