9

When arriving on Sakaar Thor is subjugated by a simple electric net.

Since he is the "God of Thunder", wouldn't he be immune to that? Or was it not a common electric energy?

  • 5
    Evidently he was not immune to whatever it was. That's probably all we'll ever learn about it. – J Doe Nov 6 '17 at 2:33
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    There's no reason to think it was anything other than ordinary electricity. He'd been magically depantsed at that point, remember. – Harry Johnston Nov 6 '17 at 3:25
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    God of Thunder is more a title for Mjolnir's wielder than a set of powers. – Taladris Nov 6 '17 at 4:11
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    @Taladris Although in Ragnarok that does seem to change (to put it as spoiler-free as possible). – ConMan Nov 6 '17 at 5:00
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    Similar question from sister site : How can gods be affected by their own power? – Ankur Rathee Nov 6 '17 at 8:49
15

The movie doesn't address it explicitly but we can guess what happened.

This question is about a plot point of a recently released movie, so obviously spoilers ahead

In short: Thor is subjugated by a simple electric net because, at that time, he is not the God of Thunder. He truly becomes it during the movie.

First of all, Thor produces thunder a few times in the movie:

  1. Firstly, when fighting Surtur at the beginning of the movie, Thor produces lightning using Mjolnir.
  2. He tries to impress people on Sakaar but can only produce sparkles.
  3. His eyes turn lightning blue and he can throw bolts of lightning during the gladiator fight against Hulk.
  4. Again, his remaining eye turns lightning blue during the final battle against Hela.

The scene described by the OP appear between events 1 and 2 above. Clearly, at the time of event 2, Thor has lost his "mojo" and fighting spirit: the 9 kingdoms are in chaos; his dad just revealed he had a hidden, evil sister and died; the said sister came back from exile, overpowered him and Loki, and destroyed Mjolnir; and he is lost in space while his people are in danger.

At that point, it feels that "God of Thunder" is more a title for Mjolnir's wielder than a real set of powers. Thor has to believe it to be the true God of Thunder. This is made clear by the vision of Odin (just before event 4 above): Odin explains that Mjolnir was just a tool for Thor to focus and harness his power. Thor was wrong believing that he lost most of his powers by losing Mjolnir ("Are you the God of Hammers?" asked Odin).

Finally, the movie is about Thor's journey from Asgard's protector ("Are you a warrior?" people on Sakaar keep asking) to Odin's successor. At the beginning of the movie, Thor was not interested in ruling Asgard, but decided to investigate the Infinity Gems's threat. His lost eye clearly symbolizes that he became similar to Odin by the end of the movie. Even better than his father: if one must not look for war but should be ready for it, the best ruler is probably someone that was not looking for power.

  • Man dude you coulda warned for spoilers at least... – ASH-Aisyah Nov 10 '17 at 15:01
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    Like adding spoilers ahead at the beginning of an answer to a question that is all about a recent movie's plot? – Taladris Nov 10 '17 at 15:02
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    "said sister killed Odin".... did she? I thought just died of old age or whatever and that it was caused Hela to be able to return? – Skooba Nov 14 '17 at 19:04
  • @Skooba: good point. I edited my answer – Taladris Nov 14 '17 at 23:14
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    Terrible point, if you are reading Q&A you know is for a movie you haven't seen yet... And you get spoiled... that's on you. In this context, nobody owes you spoiler alerts, and the very notion is the disease of disclaimerism. Really? Has society descended to that? "This answer contains statements known to the state of California to cause spoilers, butthurt, or other reproductive harm" good grief. – Harper Nov 14 '17 at 23:53

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