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I've been pondering this from time to time. If Aragorn is directly related to Elros, Why couldn't he have choice to become Elven like Elrond? Because he is descended from Lúthien he could have chosen, yes, or am I wrong here?

Their story in some ways, at least through the film, seems a lot like the ancient story, and there is history about Arwen being most fair and a lot of talk of her having Lúthien's bearing. Most that was said about her was also said about Arwen. To some, Lúthien returned. There has been information emerging about how Arwen and Aragorn meet in Mandos and get permission or are awarded to live eternally in Valinor. I for one can see this happening, since this is one of those rare moments where such things do happen.

Now onto the lineage. If he was related to Elros:

  • Did the choice end with that line?
  • Doesn't Aragorn have relations to more ancient heritage? I mean, if he can be distantly but directly related to Arwen, couldn't he have this same option?
  • Or are most Numenoreans just simply this?

marked as duplicate by jwodder, ibid, Ward, amflare, Rogue Jedi Nov 28 '17 at 1:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @jwodder Whoops, already wrote a brief answer. I agree. – Neithan Nov 27 '17 at 23:35
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The choice was given to the sons of Eärendil

At the end of the First Age, there were two half-elves in Middle-earth: Elrond and Elros, the sons of Eärendil. As they belonged to both races, the Valar gave them the choice:

Now Elros and Elrond his brother were descended from the Three Houses of the Edain, but in part also both from the Eldar and the Maiar; for Idril of Gondolin and Lúthien daughter of Melian were their fore-mothers. The Valar indeed may not withdraw the gift of death, which comes to Men from Ilúvatar, but in the matter of the Halfelven Ilúvatar gave to them the judgement; and they judged that to the sons of Eärendil should be given choice of their own destiny. And Elrond chose to remain with the Firstborn, and to him the life of the Firstborn was granted. But to Elros, who chose to be a king of Men, still a great span of years was allotted, many times that of the Men of Middle-earth; and all his line, the kings and lords of the royal house, had long life even according to the measure of the Númenóreans. But Elros lived five hundred years, and ruled the Númenóreans four hundred years and ten.

The Silmarillion: Akallabêth
Page 261 (George Allen and Unwin 1977 hardback edition)

Once Elros had chosen to be mortal, it wasn't possible for his descendants to choose otherwise.

  • Ah, so i was right. Those who sharw the same father, that father being Elrond, they won't get the choice? Do Elledan and Elrohir get the choice as well then? – Galathonièl Nov 28 '17 at 0:10
  • Also, despite becoming the first Numenorean so to speak, he is still Elros, who had the choice to becom a man, some things suhggest even Arwen remained an elf in blood regardless of her choice.. – Galathonièl Nov 28 '17 at 0:12
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Aragorn could not have chosen to be an elf. Eärendil and Elwing and their children were allowed by Manwë to choose to be considered either Elves or Men. Descendants of one of the half-elven who chose to be men cannot choose to become elves; the person who made the decision chooses for all of his descendants. Elros chose to be of Man, and founded Númenor. Elrond did not choose to be a man, and so he kept living and his children had the same choice. One someone decides to join mankind, the choice is irrevocable and descendants cannot choose. Some Númenóreans didn’t like this, and they started trying to live longer, partially causing the downfall of Númenor.

  • Yeah i understand and can truly imagine that leading to thr downfall and they being tricked into being scared of death and their gift to leave Arda. =3 – Galathonièl Nov 28 '17 at 0:06

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