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I know that stormtroopers did a significant amount of policing for the Empire, but surely they could not have been the only organisation providing law enforcement.

Who acted as law enforcement in the Galactic Empire (apart from stormtroopers)?

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    This is not the answer you are looking for...but I just have to mention the Espos in the Corporate Sector as described in the Han Solo Adventures by Brian Daley. – Quasi_Stomach Jan 4 '18 at 18:39
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    @Quasi_Stomach I guess the thing to keep in mind is that different areas had different police forces – Boolean Jan 4 '18 at 18:43
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    starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Law_enforcement - Too many to count. Each planet is administered by a planetary administrator who in theory reports to their regional Senator, but in reality owes their position (and generally their loyalty) to Imperial patronage. Each planet has its own police force responsible for hum-drum crime prevention. This apparently includes law enforcement droids. – Valorum Jan 4 '18 at 18:56
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    Anyone who fancies some free rep can copy/paste some articles out of wookieepedia. ↑ – Valorum Jan 4 '18 at 18:56
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    related: youtube.com/watch?v=bocmVZXXY8w not sure which canon it is in though – MD-Tech Jan 5 '18 at 9:50
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Local (planetary) police forces served as law enforcement on many systems in the Empire. An example in canon is the Coruscant Security Force, which was composed of police droids:

Guardian police droid

(Image from Wookieepedia)

as well as non-droid officers:

Imperial era Coruscant police officer

(Image from Wookieepedia, taken from the canon short story "One Thousand Levels Down" which takes place during the Imperial era)

Another example from canon is the Royal Naboo Security Forces, an organization which we know existed during the Imperial era because it appeared in Shattered Empire, Part II which took place after Episode VI Return of the Jedi. Many of these police forces had existed since the Republic. The Empire also had a secret police force, the Imperial Security Bureau. The Imperial military (including stormtroopers) acted as law enforcement on more rebellious planets such as Ryloth (where the Empire used slave labor).

  • Isn't the SW Wikia usually considered an unreliable source? – Rand al'Thor Jan 4 '18 at 19:13
  • @Randal'Thor - It's usually quite reliable, but it's a secondary source rather than a primary source. – Valorum Jan 4 '18 at 19:15
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    @Randal'Thor Some articles are better sourced than others, but it's usually pretty reliable. The articles I linked to have links of their own to canon sources. – Null Jan 4 '18 at 19:17
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    I guess the problem is that you don't know whether it's reliable until you know whether it's reliable; after that time you don't need the information any more ... before it, you don't know whether the information is correct. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 4 '18 at 21:29
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit, that describes Wikipedia equally well (and probably any wiki). – Wildcard Jan 5 '18 at 4:04
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One example from Legends at least is CorSec, or the Corellian Security Force, which acted as the primary police force for Corellia with an imperial intelligence liasion officer to keep an eye on them.

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It is important to note that security forces were planet-specific. For example, we have: Coruscant Security Force, Royal Naboo Security Forces, Telos Security Force (TSF).

All the planet specific security forces were more or less obedient to the Empire (Imperial Security Bureau and/or Imperial Intelligence).

Additionally to these, on many planets there were other private security forces (like the Security of the Exchange or Czerka Corporation) also mostly compliant to Imperial rules and were pretty powerful on the locations of interest. So in case the local forces were resilient to comply with what's needed, the private ones made sure that thing go a little more the Empire's way.

  • Wasn't the Exchange and Czerka Corporation thousands of years before the Empire? – vsz Jan 8 '18 at 7:15
  • The question does not ask about a specific period. – Overmind Jan 8 '18 at 9:35

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