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Is there some way to search online, for what books someone has endorsed with a blurb? A service, website (amazon, goodreads) or perhaps some clever google query construction or DDG-fu to search thereof?

Since publishers use it as promotion, it would seem to make sense that they'd make this advertisement available in other ways than only on the back cover.

Strictly as an illustrative example only, and not asking for lists or recommendations specific to this example: Larry Niven and Vernor Vinge are my favourite authors, and they both contributed a back-cover blurb endorsing Karl Schroeder's novel "Sun of Suns" (on a later novel in the series, "The Sunless Countries"). But I only noticed that by chance, when browsing (very) randomly in a library.

EDIT this article says that Amazon doesn't allow reviews by authors (or blurbs or recommendations, I guess) because it's too easily abused:

Amazon.com banned authors from reviewing the books of other authors due to conflicts of interest. Essentially, Amazon figured authors would either praise the works of their friends or pan the authors they hate. Not that this is totally true, but there’s enough truth to understand Amazon’s actions.

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  • This is off topic, definitely, but if there's an answer I'd like to know it.
    – Cugel
    Commented Jan 22, 2018 at 17:16
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    Thing is... it's a request for a method, not a specific list; the latter seems to be what that rule is more oriented toward preventing. (Note the "Feel free to ask about people's favorites in chat" part.) If such a search query or database expressly created for the purpose existed, the above question would have a simple, objective solution. It was previously asked in 2013 on MetaFilter and in 2016 on Hacker News, without success.
    – Jacob C.
    Commented Jan 22, 2018 at 20:58
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    @JacobC yes, the tour says the reason to not ask for lists is to "Avoid questions that are primarily opinion-based, or that are likely to generate discussion rather than answers.", and this request for a method is neither. How could I rewrite the question to emphasise this? Though I do admit it is something of a meta-question. Commented Jan 23, 2018 at 0:57
  • @hyperpallium You're welcome to ask this over at our chat
    – Möoz
    Commented Jan 23, 2018 at 2:14

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