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I am auditioning for a role in Shrek The Musical and I want a big role.

Which role is bigger (e.g. more stage-time): Fiona as a human, or Fiona as an ogress?

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    The movie probably won't help if it's Shrek: the Musical. – FuzzyBoots Feb 2 '18 at 21:26
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    Not sure why there are close votes saying "This question does not appear to be about science fiction or fantasy within the scope defined in the help center." Shrek: The Musical is definitely in the fantasy genre. – Thunderforge Feb 2 '18 at 22:19
  • I have removed the opinion-based portion of the question. – Rogue Jedi Feb 2 '18 at 22:37
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There are three "Fiona" parts in the script for Shrek the Musical; Young Fiona, Teen Fiona and Princess Fiona (who also plays the part of Ogress/Fiona wearing green makeup).

The part of Fiona is dramatically larger than that of her younger selves.

Young Fiona = 52 lines in total (The bulk of which are in one song at the start and 9 in the shared song at the end).

Teen Fiona = 40 lines in total (The bulk of which are in one song at the start and 5 in the shared song at the end).

Princess Fiona = 408 lines in total (138 lines in Act 1 + 270 lines in Act 2).

In the (unlikely) event that they've split off the role of Ogress/Fiona as a separate part, you should be aware that she only has 64 lines, over a third of which (23) are in the shared song at the end.

  • The question asked about "screen time" (implying that it was about the movie, not the musical) This answers a different question, about the number of lines in a play. I suggest you include information about the amount of "screen time" in the movie. – James K Feb 3 '18 at 7:21
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    @JamesK - I did briefly consider it, but I decided that it's relatively unlikely that she'll be starring in the new live-action remake of the film – Valorum Feb 3 '18 at 8:52
  • The amount of lines or screen time in past scripts need have little or nothing to do with that in new scripts. It's common for characters to be sidelined or even killed off or for writers to deliberately focus on other or newer characters in films, particularly as a film series progresses. – StephenG Feb 4 '18 at 8:17
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    @StephenG - I've looked at several versions of the show script. They haven't changed materially since v1.0. – Valorum Feb 4 '18 at 9:51
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    @FuzzyBoots - "Sorry, love. I'm busy that evening". "But I haven't told you which evening it is yet!" – Valorum Jun 14 '18 at 17:05

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