8

The scene in which kids were playing baseball shows the curvature of the station and it seemed very small to host a colony. But later, it looked very big to host several buildings and agriculture land.

How big is Cooper Station exactly?

  • There is nothing I could find, in final scripts, original scripts or interviews that seems to clearly define a size, but it’s big, I guess – Edlothiad Feb 11 '18 at 7:39
9

There's nothing in the script or the novelisation other than that it's vast and huge.

...[VAST CYLINDRICAL STATION]

and

...the huge cylinder spun on its axis


That being said, we can 'eyeball' the size based on what we see in the film:

  • These are hay bales

    enter image description here

  • Since hay bales are typically around 4-5 feet, we can use them to estimate the size of the circumference. A few frames later we see both sides of the station.

    enter image description here

    Which works out to 1700 bales of hay wide or almost exactly 1 mile diameter (3.14 miles circumference).

  • In the next shot we that Cooper is sitting looking down toward the northern pole. His house appears to be at the precise halfway point with ten (equally spaced?) sections between him and the light. In the next shot we see him looking at the southern pole which appears to be equally distant from him. Using the same measure, we can see that each section is approx 750ft in width. This gives us an (rough approximate) of 2.75 miles in length.

    enter image description here

  • 1
    And yes, this makes an absolute nonsense of the baseball scene but let's pretend that the poles taper to the point that you can hit something that far. – Valorum Feb 11 '18 at 9:37
  • 6
    @Fabian - Sure. It's 1609344 mm x 4425696 mm – Valorum Feb 11 '18 at 10:28
  • 1
    In furlongs, please! – Organic Marble Feb 11 '18 at 12:50
  • 4
    @OrganicMarble - It's 0.000000000000170108 light-years wide and 0.000000000000467796 light-years long. – Valorum Feb 11 '18 at 13:07
  • 2
    👌 Perfect. Real unit purists use only light years for distances. – Fabian Röling Feb 11 '18 at 14:42

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