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In the appendix of Shadow of Mordor for The One Ring it says

“The One Ring was forged at Orodruin and perfected by his captive, the Elven lord Celebrimbor. Sauron invested much of his power into The One Ring, and Celebrimbor, unbeknown to the Dark Lord, gave it a will of it’s own."

In an answer on the site on Celembrimbor and the One Ring, the following can be found:

"So, you bear so much of your maker's nature, let's give you a will of your own and see how Sauron enjoys being "served" by an intelligence as duplicitous and ambitious as his own!" Atticus_of_Amber - Shadow of Mordor - Celebrimbor and The One Ring

However looking through both games again I can't find this quote. So is there anywhere in both games where it is stated outside the appendix what Celebrimbor did to Sauron's ring and where?

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    That doesn't seem to be a quote but a sentence the OP made up themselves. – Edlothiad Feb 15 '18 at 13:34
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The OP (Atticus_of_Amber) seems to have come up with the quote themselves as an additional piece to their anecdotal answer.

Taking a closer look at the passage in question we see that Atticus was in fact just making up the quote, as evidence by their assumptions that such an occasion had occurred.

Moreover, the One Ring's "mind of its own" seems to be a unique feature among the Rings - yet also just the sort of subtle booby trap one can imagine an enslaved Celebrimbor might slip into the improvements and modifications made under Sauron's supervision - "So, you bear so much of your maker's nature, let's give you a will of your own and see how Sauron enjoys being "served" by an intelligence as duplicitous and ambitious as his own!"
Atticus_of_Amber - Shadow of Mordor - Celebrimbor and The One Ring

From a canonical point of view, none of this could've occurred, but since the scope is the Shadow of Mordor/War games we have to take the canon from there. In the games, as stated by the asker of the question, this passage, never occurs. Based on the highlighted words, it is clear that this passage is entirely conjecture created by Atticus as a means of explaining what he meant to say.

This is further evidenced by the following line, showing Atticus has attempted to use the assumption to clarify an inconsistency:

Celebrimbor's theft of the ring and his brief campaign to become a rival Lord of Mordor ("the Bright Lord") then actually makes sense.
ibid.

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