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Water can't be compressed. Even with 150 times the normal atmospheric pressure (such as at the bottom of oceans), it gets compressed by less than 1%.

This would affect the mechanism of trash compactor, for sure. Totally submerged trash wouldn't get compacted at all.

Why was there water in the trash compactor of the Death Star? And, why did they turn on the compactor without filtering out water from the trash (they could certainly drain water using a small hose)?

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    @Shreedhar as mentioned by Valorum in her here what does this mean? – Edlothiad Feb 27 '18 at 12:33
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    @Shreedhar It didn't answer the question.. – Avenge The Fallen Feb 27 '18 at 12:40
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    @WhiteWidow half-rotted garbage swirled with the waste that was being pumped in from the bathrooms. that sounds like it answers your question – Edlothiad Feb 27 '18 at 12:44
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    @ths I believe how the creature survives has been asked and answered before. As for why the liquids there Sewage, food waste and some industrial byproducts: When you put food waste in a bin is it completely solid or does it have some liquid in it too? Work from there. – TheLethalCarrot Feb 27 '18 at 13:38
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    Just as they could drain the water using a hose, they could also "drain" the water by having pipes or vents around the periphery of the compactor, such that the water would be forced out through said pipes as the mechanism compacted. You could even argue that there appears to be evidence of such drainage in the fact that the water level doesn't appear to be rising while they were trying to escape the closing walls. – Steve-O Feb 27 '18 at 14:43
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This is addressed in the Official Star Wars Fact File #57. The waste includes sewage, food waste and organics which are then left to fester. All of these would obviously contain amounts of water.

All waste, from durasteel girders to organic rubbish, found its way to one of the many trash compactors in the Death Star. As such, the Rebels found themselves swimming in a stinking pool that was filled with scrap.

As to why there's still water in the chamber that our heroes land in, this is addressed in the Death Star Technical Companion. While some effort has already been made to reclaim and recycle free water, by this point in the 'compaction and disposal' process the bins are magnetically sealed to prevent cross-contamination with other bins.

The rest was sent through long waste chutes to one of the numerous trash compactors for each zone. During the rescue of Princess Leia from the Death Star's detention block, the princess blasted into just such a waste chute. The trash would then be compacted into the smallest possible size and then moved to a jettison compartment along one of the trenches. Each of the bins and compactors was magnetically sealed so that waste materials wouldn't leak into nearby compartments.

We also see in the Death Star Owner's Technical Manual that the dianoga are not merely tolerated but are actually bred and housed by the station's waste disposal personnel. It's not clear whether this is an officially sanctioned decision or just staff doing things to make their lives easier but either way, maintaining a wet, swampy condition in the waste bins is presumably an essential part of keeping these useful scavengers safe and happy.

Sometimes called 'garbage squid', dianoga evolved as marine scavengers on the swamp world Vordan. Ages ago, dianoga slithered into the hold of a space freighter, and the creatures quickly spread their populations to many planets. Thriving in sewers and river canals of large urban areas throughout the galaxy, dianoga feed on all types of refuse, and can consume almost anything except pure metals. A dianoga possesses seven tentacles it used for locomotion and to catch food, and has a single, flexible eyestalk, which can extend around corners, or up like a periscope from underwater.

Because dianogas can consume vast quantities of garbage, the Death Star's service sector not only tolerates their presence, but actually breeds them for use in the trash compactors.

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    Oh would you look at that the dupe close was correct. – TheLethalCarrot Feb 27 '18 at 17:00
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Just as they could drain the water using a hose, they could also "drain" the water by having pipes or vents around the periphery of the compactor, such that the water would be forced out through said pipes as the mechanism compacted.

You could even argue that there appears to be evidence of such drainage in the fact that the water level doesn't appear to be rising while they were trying to escape the closing walls.

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