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Having read the books several times now, one thing that just jumped out at me as unclear is why did Sansa need the hair net she wore to Joff's wedding?

I know that the hairnet was holding a Strangler crystal, but my point is why did they need to use that means to get the poison into the wedding feast?

Possibilities I've considered but can't find clear evidence:

1) The conspirators were trying to frame Sansa.
The problem with that is that I don't recall the Hairnet ever being notice as an attack vector.

2) The conspirators couldn't get the "tool" in place except by that means. The problem there is that there's no evidence that anyone was searched or otherwise prevented from bringing things other than obvious weapons into the wedding.

Overall, this approach seems to have increased the risk to the plan (maybe Sansa would decide not to wear it, maybe she would decide to mention the oddness to someone, it relied on bringing more folks into the conspiracy, etc), with little upside. So why bother?

EDIT: please note this is a book question. There seems little evidence in the books so far that Littlefinger and Lady Olenna had any contact on this subject before she came to Kings Landing from Highgarden. Littlefinger met Mace Tyrell in the field, not at his seat, while Margaery and Olenna came from Highgarden. Dontos gave Sansa the hairnet well before Olenna was even introduced as a character, and her characterization of Mace gives strong impression that he’s not a subtle or devious person, which makes it unlikely that he’d enter the betrothal with the intent to kill.

marked as duplicate by Aegon a-song-of-ice-and-fire Apr 16 '18 at 6:46

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  • It was part of her outfit, the crystal would have gone 100% unnoticed, quite an easy method for getting poison in – Edlothiad Apr 15 '18 at 19:32
  • But it could've just as easily been hidden in a sleeve pocket or any number of other vectors. Like I said in the question, there's not even evidence that guests were searched in any way. Even if you say it had to have been part of an outfit, why'd it have to be part of Sansa's outfit, given she's been notoriously unreliable with secrets. – Paul Apr 15 '18 at 19:38
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    I'm inclined to agree it could have been hidden on one of the conspirators as jewellery just as easily which would have made it easier to retrieve. Only advantage I can think is if it was caught it would have been Sansa who would take the fall which given her past is believable. – Servitor Apr 15 '18 at 20:30
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    Regardless if this is a "books only" question, the other is a books and show question and a good answer to the other would answer this question, they remain as dupes. – Edlothiad Apr 16 '18 at 10:45
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For Justin (Just-in-case)

You're right to question this convoluted method and why it even needed to include Sansa at all. But the whole point of the Purple Wedding plot was to get rid of Joff in the most discreet way possible, and make it seem as little like an assassination as possible.

As such, it had to be as far removed from the Tyrells as possible. Enter, Sansa; the young, unwitting and seemingly ambitious heiress, who's family is known to have committed treason.

You say that there was no evidence of searches, but there definitely was a lot of tight security at the Purple Wedding. Besides, Margaery and the Tyrells being so overtly close to the Throne, made it necessary to create a misdirection.

The point of the hairnet was for it to be found. Given that the missing jewel from the hairnet would have been a direct indication that it was Sansa's fault.

It is all strongly tied to luck, but at the very least, it absolves the Tyrells from any suspicion.

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    A quote or two would improve this answer, although it's all very factual points. – Edlothiad Apr 16 '18 at 6:02
  • He who lives in harmony with himself lives in harmony with the universe. - Marcus Aurelius – Möoz Apr 17 '18 at 0:16
  • A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, ... The man who never reads lives only one. - George R. R. Martin – Möoz Apr 17 '18 at 0:17
  • @Edlothiad There ;-) – Möoz Apr 17 '18 at 0:18

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