12

There are some universes which claim or pretend to be consistent and aren't (Star Wars), some which try but know they can't and do their best (Star Trek), some that are consistent, but likely due to a limited run (Firefly, either Galactica), and then ones that want to entertain and don't worry about consistency, and Futurama is in the last category.

~TangoOversway

From this I want to know two important things

  1. Has the Futurama fandom ever reacted negatively to one of its many consistency hiccups?
  2. Was there ever a retcon of a consistency error with the purpose of placating an angry fanbase?

(Remember, as ever, 'no' is an ok answer)

  • 4
    Inconsistency is one of Futurama's creative devices. Episode 1 lays the groundwork when Bender re-attaches his arms. Both his arms fall off, bender picks up his right arm with his left, attaches it, then picks up his left arm with his right, and attaches it. You expect it to be inconsistent, and the stage is set. If you use inconsistency as a tool, why would it ever directly harm you? – Gorchestopher H Jun 18 '12 at 12:28
  • 3
    This is an excellent question - not just because I'm credited with the quote, but because it addresses something that's a big part of Futurama. While there have been a ton of trivial questions and questions about events that can change depending on the episode, this asks about whether the flux in canon matters to this show. Unfortunately, people don't upvote good questions nearly as much as they upvote mediocre answers. – Tango Jun 18 '12 at 15:07
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    @TangoOversway They upvote interesting questions they can answer satisfactorily. And I can't blame them for that. – AncientSwordRage Jun 18 '12 at 15:18
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    @TangoOversway: Maybe you're confusing two things. While this is a terribly interesting point about Futurama, that would be great to have an answer to, it is in itself probably very far from being able to produce a constructive, objective answer that is not based on personal speculation. Therefore it is not necessarily a good question. I still up voted it (while I should have VTC'd it) because I'm trapped in the same confusion. – bitmask Jun 18 '12 at 20:21
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    Queue meta discussion – AncientSwordRage Jun 18 '12 at 21:32
18

No

While no statistical data was ever released linking viewership to appearances of large plot inconsistencies, considering the type of series Futurama is, the answer is no.

As I mentioned in my comment, inconsistency is one of Futurama's creative devices. Episode 1 lays the groundwork when Bender re-attaches his arms. Both his arms fall off, bender picks up his right arm with his left, attaches it, then picks up his left arm with his right, and attaches it. You expect it to be inconsistent, and the stage is set. If you use inconsistency as a tool, why would it ever directly harm you?

Note that Futurama may have a bit of an over-arching story, or even smaller arcs at times, but the main focus of them is propagate comedic situations, made more fond due to reference.

The drive of the series has as little to do with a consistent story line. To compare it to something else, I'd say Futurama is as likely to be harmed by its inconsistent plot as checkers is abandoned by people who prefer green over red.

  • 1
    "If you use inconsistency as a tool, why would it ever directly harm you?" Perhaps you are left-handed? ;) – Williham Totland Jun 18 '12 at 18:23
2

The answer would be no. They don't care that they are inconsistent and the fans don't care either. I think they make an effort though. In the pilot, when the countries are counting down in the future, the french speak english. Later on, the Professor's machine translates into a dead language; french. However, there are scenes where french is spoken.

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