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What would happen if two wizards made each other a Horcrux? Would they be invincible? How would you kill one of them?

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    .... well, Voldemort wasn't invincible and lost his body even with lots of Horcruxes, so probably just the usual way. – Radhil May 11 '18 at 16:08
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    In regards to this question being closed, wouldn't we know exactly how this would work? Both Nigani and Harry were living receptacles and those receptacles were destroyed. How is having 2 wizards using each other as soul receptacles much different? – Ellesedil May 11 '18 at 17:45
  • How would you protect such a Horcrux? The locket, cup, and diadem were strongly protected with Dark Magic to prevent destruction. If your friend was a Horcrux and got run over a bus, what would have been the point? Better to use an object you can hide in a cave or large warehouse (wait, that was Raiders...). – scott May 11 '18 at 18:16
  • With the way the fragment separated from Harry as soon as he ended up at the "king's cross" afterlife, I'd assume a horcrux is carried in the body, not the soul/self/whatever. If one of your mutual-horcrux-wizards is shaken loose from their body, as voldie was the first time round, the horcrux would probably go with it - so the horcrux could be destroyed via any method that destroys a body. – Megha May 12 '18 at 4:35
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    This seems to be a fairly factual question as to how Horcruxes work. – Alex Jan 28 at 8:24
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A horcrux does not prevent a wizard from being destroyed.

Voldemort lost his flesh and blood body when his Killing Curse rebounded on him. The only thing his Horcruxes did for him was anchor his spirit, allowing him to return once he recreated a body.

So in the unlikely case of two wizards being Horcruxes for each other, once any one was similarly destroyed, that would also destroy any Horcrux. There would be no body for the "foreign" soul to reside in. Removing both wizards from their body would be enough to send them both beyond the veil, since neither can act as an anchor for the other while they're merely spirits themselves.

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No, they wouldn’t be invincible.

Horcruxes can be destroyed, and putting one in another wizard won’t save it from destruction. The pieces of soul in Horcruxes are dependent on the objects they’re encased in. One in a living being depends on that being staying alive and in its body - killing Nagini also killed the piece of the Dark Lord’s soul in her.

“But my point is that whatever happens to your body, your soul will survive, untouched,’ said Hermione. ‘But it’s the other way round with a Horcrux. The fragment of soul inside it depends on its container, its enchanted body, for survival. It can’t exist without it.”
- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Chapter 6 (The Ghoul in Pyjamas)

Wizards who have Horcruxes can’t be killed, but they can be ripped from their bodies by things that would kill them, like the Dark Lord was when hit by the Killing Curse.

“I was ripped from my body, I was less than spirit, less than the meanest ghost … but still, I was alive. What I was, even I do not know … I, who have gone further than anybody along the path that leads to immortality. You know my goal – to conquer death. And now, I was tested, and it appeared that one or more of my experiments had worked … for I had not been killed, though the curse should have done it.”
- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Chapter 33 (The Death Eaters)

If two wizards each make each other a Horcrux, the first time that one is ripped from their body, the other’s Horcrux would be destroyed as it can’t live without its enchanted body, which in this case would be the body of the first wizard. Then, the first wizard would be bodiless, and the second would have no Horcruxes, so could be killed. Killing the second wizard would be then relatively easy, and killing them would then destroy the first wizard’s Horcrux, leaving them mortal. Though it’s a bit complex to kill both, it’s nowhere near impossible - killing the Dark Lord required even more steps, but was still done.

  • Good answer, as ever, Miss Bella. And I would argue that the fact Harry was not destroyed utterly is more reason to say that he was not a true Horcrux - for if he had been he would have had to been destroyed utterly for Voldemort to be die wouldn't he? I guess the taking in of Harry's blood might be part of that but even so if it was a true Horcrux - it's as you said: if the object (Or in the case of Nagini creature) is completely destroyed the Horcrux is too. Your last paragraph is interesting; I interpret it as the wizards made the Horcruxes with the killing of the other wizard. – Pryftan Feb 12 at 23:20
  • ...rather than making the other a Horcrux with the murder of another human, that is. – Pryftan Feb 12 at 23:21

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