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Very few wizards smoke in Harry Potter.

However, drinking is glorified and quite regular.

Is there an in-universe reason for this disparity of the Wizard World to the Muggle world, where smoking is more common?

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    You're basing this question off a question you asked 2 minutes ago, which has no answers? Smoking in general is quite taboo in the UK, it's very likely this has worked it's way into JKRs writing. – Edlothiad Aug 26 '18 at 13:36
  • @Edlothiad I know the answer is few. See here: quora.com/Does-Harry-Potter-have-any-smoking-scenes In that question I just want the complete list. – TheAsh Aug 26 '18 at 13:37
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    @Edlothiad There wasn't nearly as much of a smoking taboo in the UK in the late 80s and early 90s (compared to now). The smoking bans didn't come in until 2006. However, back then it was still far more taboo than alcohol with regard to children. – Nicola Talbot Aug 26 '18 at 14:58
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    The answer to the linked question strongly suggests that smoking isn't all that uncommon in HP. Doesn't look much different to when I was in the UK in the early to mid 90s. – Harry Johnston Aug 26 '18 at 19:44
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    @Wikis There are some that smoke pipes, but that's an interesting idea. Given that wizards don't seem to be susceptible to the types of diseases that muggles get, perhaps they're not as affected by cigarettes. – Nicola Talbot Aug 27 '18 at 15:28
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As mentioned in the comments, smoking is far more taboo than alcohol in the UK — more so since the smoking ban in 2006, but still taboo for children in the early 1990s.

The Harry Potter series (1–7) is essentially a boarding school / coming-of-age story with magic. Coming-of-age types of stories typically (in the UK, at least) only feature children smoking in illicit contexts, such as behind the bike sheds or amongst a gang of delinquents.

For example, Michael Frayn's Spies features children who at one point smoke in a hidden location, but in this case the plot revolves around a couple of kids using that place to spy on an adult. The under-age smoking in this context fits in with the secrecy and loss of innocence.

In Harry Potter (as mentioned in Valorum's answer to the linked question), Dudley and his friends smoke, which adds to the general image of their delinquent nature, because teenage smoking is taboo. The reader certainly wouldn't expect a law-abiding character like Hermione to smoke. If she did, the reader would gain a completely different impression of her. (There's no save-the-world-from-evil excuse for such a breach.) The plot doesn't revolve around three kids experimenting behind the bikebroom shed.

On the other hand, teenagers drinking certain types of alcoholic drinks was quite acceptable in the early 1990s in the UK (and possibly still is). For example, a glass of wine at a meal with adults, pimms in the summer, mulled wine at Christmas or champagne at a wedding reception. Hard stuff was (and still is) taboo. A kid sneaking a bottle of vodka into school was also likely to smoke and be considered a trouble-maker.

All the instances of smoking listed in the other answer fit in with the setting and show something about the character. (Dudley's a thug, a woman smoking a pipe is eccentric, etc.) Although the magical world does have some different customs from the muggle world, it's likely that teenage smoking is a taboo they share, otherwise the narrative (which is mostly from Harry's point of view) would note the difference.

The other thing that's noteworthy in Valorum's answer (just considering the books 1–7) is that all the characters in the wizarding world who smoke seem to use pipes, which fits in with smoking in common fantasy settings (such as in Lord of the Rings).

Rand al'Thor's comment is also quite pertinent:

I'd add that Fred and George do seem like the type who might be smokers in a Muggle school. Maybe they got their kicks from magical troublemaking instead (fireworks, anyone?) ... and in fact that could be another general factor why we don't see much smoking at Hogwarts: the kids with a tendency for delinquency would be more likely to, for example, experiment with banned spells or potions than anything so mundane as cigarettes.

Also b_jonas's comment provides a quote from JKR in 2001 about her own childhood smoking and her attempt to conceal it, which illustrates that at the time she was fully aware that it was illicit and would get her into trouble if she was discovered:

I remember hanging out of my bedroom window smoking behind the curtains late at night. My father will not be happy to hear that. I wasn't very clever about that, either, because, you know, I used to leave the cigarette the cigarette ends were, you know, below the window, I mean, ‘Oh yeah someone from the pub, dad, has been throwing them into the garden again.’

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    Good answer, but I'd add that Fred and George do seem like the type who might be smokers in a Muggle school. Maybe they got their kicks from magical troublemaking instead (fireworks, anyone?) ... and in fact that could be another general factor why we don't see much smoking at Hogwarts: the kids with a tendency for delinquency would be more likely to, for example, experiment with banned spells or potions than anything so mundane as cigarettes. – Rand al'Thor Aug 27 '18 at 13:35
  • @Randal'Thor I think that's a very good point. Do you mind if I add that to the answer? – Nicola Talbot Aug 27 '18 at 14:03
  • Please feel free :-) – Rand al'Thor Aug 27 '18 at 14:15
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    Near "smoking is far more taboo than alcohol in the UK" about children, would it be worth to add this supporting quote by JKR herself from 2001? “I remember hanging out of my bedroom window smoking behind the curtains late at night. My father will not be happy to hear that. I wasn't very clever about that, either, because, you know, I used to leave the cigarette the cigarette ends were, you know, below the window, I mean, ‘Oh yeah someone from the pub, dad, has been throwing them into the garden again.’” accio-quote.org/articles/2001/1201-bbc-hpandme.htm – b_jonas Aug 28 '18 at 15:38
  • @b_jonas Thanks. I've added it. – Nicola Talbot Aug 28 '18 at 15:53

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