3

As most of you know, Captain America uses his shield to protect himself from a lot of stuffs, be it physical attacks, projectiles, explosions, electrical shock, fire, cold, ...

Thanks to the properties of the main alloy used in his shield (aka vibranium), most of the time, he comes out unscratched.

However, the vibranium is a metal. And metal is mainly know for being good conductors, both electrical and heat, whether cold or hot. Despite this, the shield is oftenly depicted blocking off electrical and heat based attacks, and the shield holder doesn't seem to feel it.

Black Panther blocking off Hoarfen's cold breath during their assault on Asguard Black Panther blocking off Hoarfen's cold breath during their assault on Asguard with Captain America's shield, The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, season 1 episode 26 "A Day Unlike Any Other"

During the above scene, Black Panther was standing inside Hoarfen's mouth and used Captain America's shield to protect himself from the cold breath, and he came out undamaged, although his hands should have frozen from holding the shield.

Some answers to this Quora question claim that vibranium is indeed a conductor in some way (though they're talking only about electrical conductivity). But then, Captain was depicted blocking a blow from Mjollnir without getting hurt.

Captain America blocking a blow from with his shield Captain America blocking a blow from Mjollnir using his shield, The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, season 1 episode 9 "Living Legend"

Is there any canon information about the conductivity of Captain's shield?

This question might be related, although it's speaking of the adamantium alloy.

  • 1
    i.stack.imgur.com/LjqTg.png - Marvel Handbook Vol 1 – Valorum Oct 20 '18 at 18:42
  • 1
    i.stack.imgur.com/7Ipvn.png - Marvel Handbook Vol 1 (addendum) – Valorum Oct 20 '18 at 18:49
  • 3
    How is "canon" defined here? Kind of 70+ years of comics, movies, TV shows... Is just having a Marvel stamp enough? ;D – Jenayah Oct 20 '18 at 18:56
  • 2
    I suppose it's possible that while being a electrical and thermal conductor it just has a ludicrously high specific heat capacity and capacitance so that such effects are distributed over an extremely large timescale, leaving the user unharmed. I doubt it though, that seems too handwavey even for marvel – Ummdustry Oct 20 '18 at 21:19
  • 2
    Given the number of times Cap's been zapped while holding his shield, shield which did light up, with electrical arcs and everything, but Captain was left alive afterwards, I'm starting to wonder whether the shield might be conductive, but not the gloves... – Jenayah Oct 20 '18 at 22:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.