7

In Deadpool 2 after Deadpool

gets ripped in half by the Juggernaught and he starts to grow his legs back

he has no scarring on them.

Now it is entirely possible that when he grows new limbs that the scarring won't be there, but remember at the start where he gets blown to bits and grows back his body, the scarring is still there.

What is the reason for this?

In or out of universe answers will be accepted.

  • Do you mean his cancer scars? or scars from the injury? – Shreedhar Nov 10 '18 at 18:26
  • 1
    @Shreedhar, his scars from being turned into a mutant. – KyloRen Nov 12 '18 at 2:05
7

Because it's funnier with non-scarred baby legs

The answer invariably comes from an out of universe perspective and it is mainly because the joke is funnier if the legs don't have scarring. Dan Glass, the production visual effects supervisor, worked with VFX studio, Double Negative, to create this scene and here is what he has to say on the matter:

And then the final thing was, the look of the legs themselves. We did try and concept some variations that were more weird, almost fetal and alien-like limbs, more like the hand that appears in the first movie. But it felt quickly that that got a little too gross and unappealing. In the script dialogue from early on, although you obviously have Domino and Weasel’s reactions, which are fairly repulsed, Domino, of course, comes in and says, ‘No, I’m talking about your face. Your legs are cute.’

And so, that gives us a clue as to what the intent of the writers was. I think the idea of bringing them to be more recognisably human and – although, it’s sort of a controversial discussion, or at least it felt like it was always going to be a slightly odd and difficult thing to pull off. But, actually being more normal with it, I think, it helps the humour and helps you concentrate on the humour of the scene and not be so horrified or appalled at what’s going on below.

VFXBLOG - Visual effects journalist Ian Failes, Deadpool 2’S What the…!? Scene and how it was made

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