6

I'm trying to remember which book this is in her early novels, unfortunatly my collection is in storage at the moment and I can't check.

One of her earlier novels deals with hyperspace and how it makes some people go mad so they take a drug to induce a sleep like state while they travel through hyperspace.

This particular book is based mainly aboard a ship, at the end of the novel I am thinking of a man and women remain awake and it describes hyperspace in the last chapters.

  • In most of the Alliance-Union universe novels most of the characters, even non-human, need to be tranquilized for jump. The main exceptions being the Kif (Chanur novels), the Mri and a few select individuals of various races. (Fleet navigators and Hilfy Chanur, IIRC) – DavidW Nov 21 '18 at 16:25
  • The specific story doesn't ring any bells with me, but maybe CJ Cherryh's bibliography will help to job your memory. – Xantec Nov 21 '18 at 16:58
  • Port Eternity? – Lexible Nov 22 '18 at 16:22
7

I suspect it's Tripoint, but many of her stories include the "night-walkers" who are the only people that can remain unsedated during jumps.

Update (to be a real answer):

The protagonist in Tripoint is forced to join the crew of a ship. He is, like the majority of the crew, sedated during "jumps". A rare mutation allows certain people to be able to remain unsedated during jumps, the "fleet navigators", invariably referred to as "night walkers" by the other crew members. The night walkers identify themselves by wearing a unique green tattoo on the forearm.

As the book proceeds we slowly learn that the protagonist is an undiscovered night walker and begins a relationship with Capella, the ship's navigator. As this takes place during the jumps, it remains hidden from the crew who remain sedated. Due to prior history, he does not entirely trust her motives or that of the ship as a whole.

The events of the book lead inexorably to make the ship travel to an abandoned freighter near Tripoint. The various plot lines are wrapped up, and the protagonist remains on his new ship with Capella as they decide to leave charted space.

  • Technically they're not leaving "charted space," they're just leaving the region of space known to the Merchanters' Alliance. The Mazianni have travelled that way before; Capella shows Tom a leaf from a world that the Mazianni have found. – DavidW Jul 31 at 15:10
4
  • In the Chanur books, one female alien learns how to stay awake in jump and saves the ship.
  • In Rimrunners, a human is left without the sedating drug during jump prior to the start of the story, his crewmates considered him crazy before and more crazy afterwards.
  • In Tripoint there is a human navigator who can probably stay awake during jump, but there is ambiguity on that.
  • In the Faded Sun trilogy, set much later in the same universe, crew on an extended mission learn to make do without the drug to sedate them during jump as the drug runs short. The implication is that the more modern stardrive is less harsh on the human mind.
  • Maybe Wave Without a Shore?
4

I suggest that this might be one of the Faded Sun trilogy; the human protagonist (Sten Duncan) is sent to travel with the Mri who refuse to tranquilize for jump and also force him not to take tranq. So a notable aspect of the second book, The Faded Sun: Shon'Jir, is this normal human being forced to jump without tranquilizers. (When, to this point in the universe, every other human character seen has tranqued for jump.)

There are a few other characters (plus the race of Kif) who do not need tranquilizers, but they are considered exceptional (and highly prized) individuals. One of the Hani (Chur Anify) on the Pride is able to do this - at an important point in one of the novels she sets the ships guns during jump to fire on enemies who will appear just as the Pride comes out of jump. The only other named character who habitually jumps without tranq is Capella, former navigator of a Mazianni carrier (in Tripoint), but the reference to "Fleet navigators" suggests there are a few others like her.

2

I've never read them myself, but according to her bibliography on Wikipedia this seems to be one of the Chanur novels:

A jump takes several weeks of objective time. Subjectively it can take hours or even several days; this tends to exhaust the body, and the crews need to take rest between jumps... Humans can survive it undrugged, but it is a terrible experience to them.

  • I'm looking for the particular novel with the ending I mentioned. – Dreamwalker Nov 21 '18 at 16:33

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