7

Avengers 4 title Avengers: Endgame was a long kept secret and it was said it can spoil the Infinity Wars:

But how? How come this title was so big deal? Is this title have anything to do with some comic-book reference?

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    End = Final part of something. Game = Animals meant for Hunting. The significance here my friend is that Thanos is going to hunt each of the Avengers who survived the snap and it'll finalize the chapter. – S S Dec 13 '18 at 13:13
  • Should this be flagged? Pretty sure it violates the Future Works policy, just want to be sure. – Gothamite24 Dec 20 '18 at 3:27
  • Personally, I think the refusal to reveal the title for avoiding spoilers was for a couple of reasons 1) HYPE - to get people more excited about it 2) fake, as it doesn't really reveal much of anything (end of the Avengers? Hardly) 3) strategic, as it gave them a chance to change it if needed. All speculation, no evidence so just a comment, not an answer :) – m1gp0z Feb 12 at 15:13
11

"Endgame" isn't a reference to the comics, but to Infinity War. Specifically, Dr. Strange's remark upon surrendering the Time Stone:

We're in the endgame now.

This line - and his parting remark, "This was the only way" - were taken as indications that his actions throughout Infinity War, including surrendering the Time Stone, were all part of a complex long-term gambit to achieve the one timeline where Thanos is defeated. The fact it's now the title of the sequel would appear to confirm that theory.

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    Also Tony mentions "end game" in the Avengers: Age of Ultron, when he was describing the goals he had in mind for the ultron program, to Bruce Banner. – Thusal Hettiarachchi Dec 14 '18 at 4:45
5

In chess the endgame is considered a phase of the game where it can be important to sacrifice a powerful piece in order to win the game. Many see that as an indication that while we might see a victory for our Marvel heroes, they might need to buy that with some true lasting sacrifices, e.g. loss/deaths of characters that won't be undone.

There's also some other associations with a chess endgame:

  1. It's likely there is some form of "Zugzwang", i.e. one party needs to do a move they'd rather not do. For example they might need to take an enemy piece in order to not loose or move to another position, but that move means defeat in the next round - or at least an even worse situation.
  2. Pawns become more important, especially if they get through to the other side (turning them into more powerful pieces). This makes moves that sacrifice a powerful piece for a pawn to reach the other side more likely.
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    Sacrifices in the opening and middle game are also reasonably common, although opening sacrifices are not usually very large. I wouldn't consider this a feature of the endgame. One characteristic of the endgame is that it's part of the game where there's enough pieces off the board so that things become much easier to predict. – David Thornley Dec 13 '18 at 18:40
  • @DavidThornley As a non-expert on chess my understanding is that it's more likely sacrificing an important piece is helpful to win and an "okay" tactic whereas initially one would rather sacrifice a less important piece. – Frank Hopkins Dec 14 '18 at 11:53
  • @Darkwing in Chess, realistically all pieces except King are sacrificial. Its much more than an "okay" tactic if your opponent bites so hard on taking that sacrifice but leaving King vulnerable to checkmate/stalemate. – enorl76 Dec 18 '18 at 7:05

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