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So I was wondering: What would happen, if someone shoved a... let´s say 100ft pole through the stargate, while there´s not enough space for it on the other side?

The most well known case of this is probably when something hits the iris, which leaves almost no space to rematerialize. I´ve read that the object dissolves into energy, which is why the iris almost melted when it was shot with a particle beam. So I get how it works on the small scale.

But let´s get back to that 100ft pole. Once it enters the event horizon entirely, it´s transported to the other stargate, let´s say the one in the SGC (no iris). What happens then?
I would guess, the pole materializes little by little, coming out of the event horizon until it hits a wall. And then?
Does it dissolve into energy? Where does the energy go? I mean, will the whole pole just explode?

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From the question:

I´ve read that the object dissolves into energy, which is why the iris almost melted when it was shot with a particle beam. So I get how it works on the small scale.

Not completely correct. The matter "fails to re-integrate", which I take to mean it reflects back into the Stargate and is destroyed when the Stargate disengages.

That isn't why Sokar's particle beam heated up the gate, either:

Certain types of weapons can breach the iris, albeit inefficiently. The System Lord Sokar devised a means to breach the iris by firing a particle beam accelerator through the wormhole, the subatomic particles being small enough to reintegrate in the space between the iris and the event horizon, thus heating the iris up.

Remainder of the question:

I would guess, the pole materializes little by little, coming out of the event horizon until it hits a wall. And then? Does it dissolve into energy? Where does the energy go? I mean, will the whole pole just explode?

It wouldn't go anywhere for about 38 minutes. The Stargate doesn't actually push anything through the event horizon on either side, which is why the puddle jumper was still stuck even after the pods were retracted in Thirty-Eight Minutes.

Once those 38 minutes are up, the Stargate will disengage, and whatever had not yet exited the Stargate will get chopped off and no longer exist. While The Torment of Tantalus was kind of inconsistent with regards to transmission (this was an early episode, before all the rules were completely set), it's also the first example that comes to mind of what happened in the question. Ernest Littlefield's lifeline was simply cut when the wormhole disengaged.

  • No long exist is not really correct. The theory McKay had was that the particles would be scattered in sub space. (From 38 minutes)... as a side note does anyone else think it is awefully convienent that 38 minutes is about the perfect length for an episode? – Chad Jul 13 '12 at 20:30
  • @Chad Hmmm... Good point. But did McKay say it definitively, or was he guessing/"theorizing"? – Izkata Jul 13 '12 at 22:36
  • @Chad I also remember thinking that about the episode length at one point, but it also doesn't seem so convenient in that episodes are rarely real-time – Izkata Jul 13 '12 at 22:36
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The gates are smart. They don't transmit anything that it could reasonable assume would be able to make it through in the timeframe (NOT 38 minutes, that's just the standard ammount). Take the Torment of Tantalus episode. The earth gate had no DHD, nor did the gate on Heliopolis. Thus, the power being force-fed into the gate from the Earth side was all it could get. Therefore, it couldn't remail open for the whole 38 minutes. The gate, detecting that there was no biologic/organic matter currently at the event horizon, transmitted earnest directly before shutting down. A 'safety protocol' so to speak.

However, that doesn't exactly address the 100-ft-pole question. I believe that when it can tell that the object in question is of substantial length (longer than a puddlejumper, for instance) then it'll let it transmit and reintegrate as it goes. This is for safety, and practicality.

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    A loss of power on the transmitting side will shut down the gate even if there's a DHD on the receiving side (Stargate Command does it in a few episodes). It's only with excess energy from something absurdly powerful like a black hole that the receiving end can keep the gate open. – Izkata Jul 14 '12 at 2:50
  • Additionally, as implied in 38 minutes, there is no organic matter case programmed into the gates. If all they had to do was go into the front of the puddle jumper and wait for the gate to disengage when the time limit was up, they wouldn't have been so desperate to get the whole jumper through. – Izkata Jul 14 '12 at 2:52
  • @Izkata once the wormhole is established, the recieving gate provides the power to keep the wormhole active, through the dhd – acolyte Jul 14 '12 at 15:10
  • Not all of the power. Both sides are keeping it open, which is why when power is cut to one side the connection closes. – Izkata Jul 14 '12 at 16:19

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