-4

Hogwarts is a school full of hormone-infused teenagers who spend a decent amount of time "snogging". It stands to reason that there is plenty of...extra-snoggular...activity going on.

How is unwanted pregnancy handled/prevented at Hogwarts? Are there any examples of pregnancies occuring at Hogwarts or is there any evidence to support contraceptive spells?

  • This would appear to be a dupe of this question which itself is too broad so not sure of the best course of action though closing this probably makes the most sense. – TheLethalCarrot Feb 8 at 16:30
  • I get that it might have been a dupe (the "related" from OP seems most likely), and the first three books may have been children's fare, but I'm not sure why this question is being downvoted quite so much. It's not like JKR hasn't had huge blind spots, like the whole "love potion" thing... – Radhil Feb 8 at 18:07
  • I agree with @Radhil. The related I posted is targeted towards sex at Hogwarts. I am interested specifically in pregnancy. Also, reasons for down voting would be appreciated so I can improve the question. – Newbie12345 Feb 8 at 18:22
  • 1
14

In short it's not addressed and (unless JKR has one too many glasses of wine when her Twitter account is open) will never be addressed.

Q. How overtly concerned are you with the idea of Harry's growing up in the books?

JKR: I do want him [Harry] to grow up. I want them all to grow up, but not in a way that's unfaithful to the tone of the books, i.e., I feel it would be inappropriate-in these books -were Hermione to have an underage pregnancy or if one of them were to start taking drugs, because it's unfaithful to the tone of the books. It's not at all that I don't think those themes can be explored superbly in children's literature. It's just that in the Harry Potter books there isn't a place for those particular issues. In book four, there is the most evidence so far that they're getting older, in that they start getting interested in boys and girls. Although there's been a hint of that in book three, this time it's out in the open.

Jones, Malcolm. "The Return of Harry Potter," Newsweek, 10 July, 2000

These are books for children. You might as well ask how they're likely to address ritual satanic child abuse.

  • 1
    That interview question appears to have been asked when book 4 released. I wonder if the stance is the same for books 5, 6, and 7 which have MANY more adult themes. – Newbie12345 Feb 8 at 16:46
  • 5
    @Newbie12345 - Given the lack of overt sex, rape, teen pregnancy, drug use, etc in the final three books, it's clear that this rule continued to apply – Valorum Feb 8 at 17:01
  • 1
    though - clearly the filmmakers in for Azkaban three thought there was some funny business happening in Hogwarts - scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/61010/… – NKCampbell Feb 8 at 17:05
  • 3
    @NKCampbell - Apparently it was just a "peck on the cheek". And if you believe that, I've got a used Hippogriff I'd like you to consider buying. – Valorum Feb 8 at 17:08
  • 1
    Not to mention the possibilities and likelihood of pedophilia being an issue. Gilderoy Lockhart was capable of using his obliviation to steal others achievements and laud them as own. He was prepared to obliviate Harry and Ron in the Chamber of Secrets, what would he have done with say a seventh year female student after hours in say detention setting? The act of obliviation and his apparent mastery of the technique definitely leaves room for scenarios much darker than were ever explored without taking into account that these were children’s books until the latter three installments. – user111346 Feb 8 at 22:04
1

Harry Potter has often shied away from issues like sex or drug abuse because in the end, it's set in a fairy tale world where years of emotional and sometimes physical abuse has not left Harry an insecure wreck.

It's an idealized world with well defined villans and heroes and very few moral grey areas. Therefore gritty realism and issues like Teen pregnancy etc. doesn't really have a place in Harry Potter series something the author herself agrees with:

I feel it would be inappropriate-in these books -were Hermione to have an underage pregnancy or if one of them were to start taking drugs, because it's unfaithful to the tone of the books. It's not at all that I don't think those themes can be explored superbly in children's literature. It's just that in the Harry Potter books there isn't a place for those particular issues.

Now if one were to move away from JK Rowling's opinion on this issue, it would be rather easy to induce a abortion using muggle means.

In muggle means we have Misoprostol with up to 90% rate of abortion. The muggleborn students are sure to have heard of this drug and would use it in case it's required.

Magical means, I don't think exist since the population of magicals is so low, they would not bother developing effective contraceptive or abortion methods. Most pureblood families have one offspring, Weasleys being the exception. However its not unlikely for them to use muggle means like condoms/contraceptive pills for protection if they know about it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.