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In general, especially before the Treaty of Alliance, and the earlier neutral zone cease-fires, the Klingons thought very lowly of humanity.

However, fast-forward, in time to after the Treaty of Alliance, the Klingons likely would have access to human history. Would they have gained further respect for humanity after learning that WE had warriors much like theirs for many centuries (before we evolved to our technological advancement in the Federation), like Roman soldiers, Greek Spartans, or Samurais?

Yes the Federation has "warriors" of sorts, in combat-trained field officers for away missions and tactical officers and security officers on starships, but I'm referring to the Klingons' native passion for up-close and personal hand to hand combat with sharp blades and death. Humanity has essentially evolved beyond that by the time of the Federation.

So if a Klingon read about Sparta, Rome, or Imperial Japan, would that change their perspective on humanity quite a bit? Are there any episodes/scenes in any of the series/films/books where a Klingon mentions human warriors of old? I'm not asking for opinion-based answers. I'm asking for answers based upon 1) factual mentions in any Star Trek series/films/books, and 2) factual data based upon the Star Trek universe (memory alpha, any other resources).

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    Nope. The Klingons respect only actions – Valorum Apr 22 at 17:33
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    Voted to leave open, if only for "Are there any episodes/scenes in any of the series/films where a Klingon mentions human warriors of old?". That doesn't seem POB, and if Klingons only respect actions, well that's an answer – Jenayah Apr 22 at 17:52
  • They ought to respect humans in general. Every time a "warrior" Klingon encounters a human, the Klingon gets his own ass handed to him on a silver platter. – JRE Apr 22 at 17:55
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    The problem here is that the title question doesn't seem to match what you're actually asking in the last paragraph and the title question is pretty much POB. And then because of this distinction some other sentences could mean 1 of 2 things and so that also makes this fall into unclear and too broad territory. Fixing the title to be more specific would help clean this up but you may need to clarify some of the sentences in the post itself as well. – TheLethalCarrot Apr 23 at 16:01
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    They respect Shakespeare, a warrior of words. – Xantec Apr 23 at 16:36
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It is clear that Klingons do respect human warriors as individuals, even if they do not have a high opinion of humanity as a whole. This was true even before the Next Generation era. Consider, for example, this ominous dialogue from Star Trek VI:

Chang, Kerla, and Kirk

GENERAL CHANG: I've always wanted to meet you, Captain.
KIRK: I'm not sure how to take that.
BRIGADIER KERLA: Sincere admiration, Kirk, ....
CHANG: ... from one warrior to another.

It is not entirely clear whether Chang is actually sincere in his admiration, but Kerla certainly seems to be.

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    This doesn't answer the question asked "So if a Klingon read about Sparta, Rome, or Imperial Japan, would that change their perspective on humanity quite a bit? Are there any episodes/scenes in any of the series/films where a Klingon mentions human warriors of old?" – Valorum Apr 22 at 18:46

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