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‘Listen to me, reliving family history …’ he said quietly. ‘Why, I am growing quite sentimental … But look, Harry! My true family returns …’

[Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Chapter 33]

Surely he didn't consider them his equals and according to Dumbledore, he had no friends, let alone family. Why is that he called the Death Eaters his true family then?

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    Voldy grew up in an orphanage. It's not like he had much family to start with. – RichS Jun 3 at 20:13
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    I think that, judging from this, we can say with some certainty that "family" means neither "friends" nor "equals" to Voldemort. But, to be fair, it doesn't mean those things in the real world either. It's a different word and a different concept. "Equals," "friends," and "family" may coincide for many people, but they are different concepts nonetheless. – Misha R Jun 3 at 22:44
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He likely meant he ‘claims’ them instead.

The Dark Lord calling the Death Eaters his “true family” was likely just to contrast the group of powerful wizards who pledged loyalty to him with his Muggle father who he disowned. Though he didn’t love any of the Death Eaters or think of them as friends, he was willing to claim them as his, as opposed to his Muggle relatives. Right before calling the Death Eaters his true family, he spoke about his Muggle father who abandoned his mother, and how he loathed him.

“You see that house upon the hillside, Potter? My father lived there. My mother, a witch who lived here in this village, fell in love with him. But he abandoned her when she told him what she was … he didn’t like magic, my father …

‘He left her and returned to his Muggle parents before I was even born, Potter, and she died giving birth to me, leaving me to be raised in a Muggle orphanage … but I vowed to find him … I revenged myself upon him, that fool who gave me his name … Tom Riddle …

Still he paced, his red eyes darting from grave to grave.

‘Listen to me, reliving family history …’ he said quietly. ‘Why, I am growing quite sentimental … But look, Harry! My true family returns …’

The air was suddenly full of the swishing of cloaks. Between graves, behind the yew tree, in every shadowy space, wizards were Apparating. All of them were hooded and masked.”
- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Chapter 33 (The Death Eaters)

He did not choose nor want to have a Muggle relative. However, he did likely take pride in having a large group of powerful wizards who at one point swore him eternal loyalty.

“I see you all, whole and healthy, with your powers intact – such prompt appearances! – and I ask myself … why did this band of wizards never come to the aid of their master, to whom they swore eternal loyalty?”
- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Chapter 33 (The Death Eaters)

Several times, he describes them as ‘his’ Death Eaters, indicating that he’s willing to take ownership of them - only as followers, certainly not as equals, but he likely took some amount of pride in having gained himself a following.

“I remember only forcing myself, sleeplessly, endlessly, second by second, to exist … I settled in a faraway place, in a forest, and I waited … surely, one of my faithful Death Eaters would try and find me … one of them would come and perform the magic I could not, to restore me to a body … but I waited in vain …”
- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Chapter 33 (The Death Eaters)

Therefore, him calling the Death Eaters his true family was most likely so he could disown his Muggle relatives in favor of claiming a powerful group of wizards who were subordinate to him instead, rather than any real feelings of kinship towards them.

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