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I read this book in the very early '60s about a group of intergalactic zoo specimen hunters and their adventures.

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Interplanetary Hunter, a 1956 novel by Arthur K. Barnes, a fix-up of four novelettes and a novella: "The Hothouse Planet", "Satellite Five", "Siren Satellite", "The Seven Sleepers", "Trouble on Titan" (links to the Internet Archive). The adventures of Gerry Carlyle, interplanetary huntress, who roams the solar system (with Terry Strike, whom she met on Venus in "The Hothouse Planet") collecting specimens for the Interplanetary Zoo in London. ("The Seven Sleepers" was co-written with Henry Kuttner.)

Arthur K. Barnes, _Interplanetary Hunter_, Gnome Press, 1956

Excerpt from "Satellite Five":

Just then the office door slid noiselessly open, and all activity was automatically suspended as an amazing girl entered. The golden-haired beauty who crossed the room was a lithe-limbed, clean-striding American girl — a bit wilful, perhaps, to judge from her firm chin and high-tempered arch of nostril.

Her simple presence in that office brought an elusive suggestion of faraway places and unfamiliar, romantic things — a breath of the thin, dry wind that combs the deserts of Mars, a faint memory of the spicy scents that throng Venus' eternal mists.

For this was Gerry Carlyle, most famous Earth-woman in the System, admired and beloved by millions for her exploits along the spaceways.

Admittedly she was the greatest of all that hardy band who roam the distant worlds risking their lives in the toughest game of all — capturing and bringing back alive the weird and monstrous creatures that crawl their lethal way over the inhospitable surface of the planets and their satellites, many of whose breath is poison, and whose fangs are death, yet whose captive bodies are worth thousands of dollars to the intrepid hunter who can sell them, alive and kicking, to one of the great zoos of the world.

This slim girl, so charming, so feminine, was unquestionably tops in the most dangerous profession that men can choose.

She dominated the room at once, compellingly.

_Startling Stories_, September 1949

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